mindfulness

10 tips for mindful eating — just in time for the holidays

Wynne Armand, MD

Contributing Editor

Eating without awareness can lead to overeating and take away much of the pleasure that can be found in your meals. During the holidays, it can easily cause you to overindulge. Taking a mindful approach to meals by slowing down and savoring the experience can not only help with weight control, but also enhance health and well-being — as well as your enjoyment of the meal.

Yoga and meditation offer health care savings—and you can do them at home

Marlynn Wei, MD, JD

Contributing Editor

Results from a recent study show that people enrolled in a mind-body relaxation program (that included yoga, meditation, mindfulness, and cognitive behavioral skills) used 43% fewer medical services than they did the previous year, saving on average $2,360 per person in emergency room visits alone. But you don’t need to participate in a formal program to reap the many benefits of these practices. Many of them can be learned and practiced at home.

Stress-busting mind-body medicine reduces need for health care

Anyone can develop better emotional and psychological resilience through practices such as rhythmic breathing, mindfulness meditation, yoga, tai chi, qi gong, or prayer. These practices not only improve mental health but have real physiological benefits. A recent study found that people who completed a program designed to help bolster resilience actually used fewer health care services compared with those who didn’t take the program, although more studies are needed to know whether such programs could help ease the burdens on the health care system.

A mindful worker is a happier worker

Ronald D. Siegel, Psy.D.

Contributing Editor

The mental health benefits of mindfulness meditation include greater engagement in your daily activities and a more positive outlook — which can in turn improve your concentration and sense of well-being. But can mindfulness practice really help employees’ mental health? A recent study says yes. Workers participating in mindfulness training found they experienced less stress, anxiety, and depression; improved sleep; fewer aches and pains; and fewer problems getting along with others.

Distracted eating may add to weight gain

Howard LeWine, M.D.

Chief Medical Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

If you are worried about your weight, paying more attention to what you eat, not less, could help keep you from overeating. Multitasking—like eating while watching television or working—and distracted or hurried eating can prompt you to eat more. Slowing down and savoring your food can help you control your intake. That’s the bottom line from a report published in the April issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. It offers two key conclusions: 1) Being distracted or not paying attention to a meal tended to make people eat more at that meal. 2) Paying attention to a meal was linked to eating less later on. Mindful eating is a good solution. It can reduce daily calorie intake, help make healthier food choices, and add to the enjoyment of eating.