Vitamins and supplements

FDA curbs unfounded memory supplement claims

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Considering memory supplements? Think again. In the US, prescription medicines are rigorously tested, but supplements are not and manufacturers can make claims that may or may not be true. But even supplement makers must follow certain rules, and recently the FDA announced a plan to revamp its regulation of dietary supplements.

What’s in your supplements?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Millions of Americans take some kind of supplement, but because supplements are not regulated like prescription drugs are, taking one is not always safe. Researchers have found many instances of hidden ingredients and inaccurate quantities listed on the label.

Chondroitin and melanoma: How worried should you be?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Research in mice found that the supplement chondroitin sulfate led to the growth of melanoma cells, and though this does not mean it will do the same in people, there isn’t much evidence to support taking chondroitin anyway.

What patients — and doctors — need to know about vitamins and supplements

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

While certain groups of people, and those who have certain conditions, can benefit from taking vitamins or supplements, most people will do better obtaining the nutrients they need from eating a health, balanced diet.

Low vitamin D tied to aggressive prostate cancer

Charlie Schmidt

Editor, Harvard Medical School Annual Report on Prostate Diseases

Prostate cancer tends to be more aggressive in men with low levels of vitamin D. Among African American men, low vitamin D is also linked to a higher risk of developing prostate cancer.

Selenium, vitamin E supplements increase prostate cancer risk

Charlie Schmidt

Editor, Harvard Medical School Annual Report on Prostate Diseases

New results from a major clinical trial called SELECT show that taking selenium or vitamin E can increase the odds of developing prostate cancer. Bottom line: men shouldn’t take selenium or vitamin E as a way to prevent prostate cancer, or anything else for that matter.

Vitamin E may indeed increase the risk of prostate cancer

Nancy Ferrari

Senior editor, Harvard Health

It was once thought that taking vitamin E could reduce the risk of prostate cancer. However, recent research suggests this is not the case. Back in 2008 one large study, known as the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), showed that not only did vitamin E fail to decrease the risk of prostate […]

Vitamin E doesn’t offer protection against prostate cancer

Marc B. Garnick, M.D.

Editor in Chief, HarvardProstateKnowledge.org

Although a recent article on healthy aging in the Washington Post suggested that taking vitamin E can help men prevent prostate and other cancers, that isn’t what the evidence shows.

Blood calcium levels may be linked to prostate cancer death

Nancy Ferrari

Senior editor, Harvard Health

Research finds that men with high blood calcium levels are more likely to develop fatal prostate cancer than men with lower blood calcium levels.

Vitamin E-selenium-soy combo doesn’t prevent prostate cancer

Nancy Ferrari

Senior editor, Harvard Health

Canadian researchers report in 2009 that these supplements offer no benefit in terms of prostate cancer prevention.