Nutrition

Harvard Health Ad Watch: Are nutritional drinks actually good for you?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Senior Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

If you believe ads for nutritional supplement drinks, you might think you can improve your health by drinking them. But for most people, their value is questionable and their cost adds up.

What’s new with the Nutrition Facts label?

The Nutrition Facts label that appears on packaged foods has been updated to provide consumers with more thorough information, and also to more accurately reflect typical consumption habits.

Menopause and insomnia: Could a low-GI diet help?

Researchers examining dietary data from over 50,000 postmenopausal women found that women who ate foods with a higher glycemic index, and foods with more added sugars, were more likely to have insomnia.

What parents need to know about a vegan diet

Claire McCarthy, MD

Senior Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

If your family follows a vegan diet––or your child expresses the desire to do so on their own––it’s important for parents to be aware of the nutritional challenges of vegan eating, and how to meet them.

The complicated relationship between fish oil and heart health

The American Heart Association recommends that people with heart disease should take omega-3 fatty acids to prevent another heart attack, but research on taking them to prevent a first heart attack or stroke has been mixed. Will fish oil supplements reduce your risk of heart disease?

Yes, you can avoid weight gain over the holidays!

The holiday season presents a challenge to even to those most dedicated to health-conscious eating. Generally, people tend to gain a little weight during the holidays, but a study found that it is possible to avoid extra pounds.

10 foods that may impact your risk of dying from heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes

Researchers examining data from a national health survey and other sources found that consuming too much, or too little, of 10 foods was associated with 45% of deaths in 2012 due to type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

Feeling gassy — is it ever a cause for concern?

Matthew Solan

Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

Intestinal gas can be embarrassing, but is a normal part of digestion. Only rarely is excess gas cause for concern. Which foods you eat –– and how you digest them –– can make a difference.

Avoiding nuts and seeds for better gut health? You shouldn’t

Nuts and seeds are rich in fiber, which is important for gut health and keeping you regular. And, contrary to a common concern, no evidence links eating nuts and seeds to a painful gut infection called diverticulitis.

Stress-eating: Five strategies to slow down

People respond to stress in many ways. If stress-eating is a go-to for you, try these strategies to ease stress and avoid its negative effects on weight.