Workplace health

How to welcome back a colleague who is in recovery

Peter Grinspoon, MD

Contributing Editor

If a colleague has been absent from work for treatment of a substance use disorder, that person’s return to work may be awkward or uncomfortable, and coworkers may feel similarly. Empathy, understanding, and a willingness to listen will help returning workers feel welcomed back.

Working through workplace stigma: Coming back after an addiction

Peter Grinspoon, MD

Contributing Editor

For many people, the most significant challenge when returning to the workplace after treatment for a substance use disorder is overcoming the doubts that coworkers may have about working with an addict. But doubt may weigh just as heavily on the person returning to work.

Working on addiction in the workplace

Addiction among employees costs American businesses billions each year, so it’s in employers’ interest to promote a healthy, drug-free workplace and facilitate treatment for those employees who seek it.

The fix for dry eyes

As we age our eyes become susceptible to dryness due to decreased tear production or slowing glands. Other conditions can contribute to dry eye syndrome as well, including looking at the screen of a computer, phone, or tablet for too long. There are a number of simple treatments that can bring relief and prevent infection and other problems.

The truth behind standing desks

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Because sitting for long periods is linked to a greater risk of premature death, the popularity of standing desks is growing, but a study of calories burned while doing various activities suggests the caloric benefit of using a standing desk is not as significant as previous studies suggested.