Stress

Grieving? Don’t overlook potential side effects

The emotional weight of grief affects the body in the form of stress, which can make existing conditions worse or cause new ones, and can also lead to depression. Maintaining health may seem difficult while grieving, but doing so can help rebuild mental strength.

Calm for the holidays

Francesca Coltrera

Senior Content Writer, Harvard Health Publishing

If the frenzied holiday season is stressing you out, try these tips to ease stress and boost calm. Even if you’re pressed for time, you’ll feel better.

Navigating tricky relationships during the holidays

Do you have a challenging relationship with certain family or friends you see during the holidays? Here’s how to navigate tricky situations and conversations thoughtfully and calmly.

Mindfulness apps: How well do they work?

James Cartreine, PhD

Contributing Editor

The goal of mindfulness training is to enhance well-being by increasing your awareness of the world around you through sensory immersion. People who are interested in trying mindfulness meditation may want to consider starting with a smartphone app.

No more counting sheep: Proven behaviors to help you sleep

Millions of people have trouble sleeping, or don’t get enough quality sleep. Changes to your daytime habits and pre-bedtime behavior can consistently help you get better sleep.

Brain science to improve your relationships

Srini Pillay, MD

Contributor

Being aware of the brain’s reactions to other people can help improve all our relationships.

Writing as an antidote to loneliness

Because social connections are vital to human development and health, and writing is a way to form or strengthen a sense of connection to others, the creative expression of writing has been found to improve health and boost healthy emotions.

Autoimmune disease and stress: Is there a link?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

An observational study found that people diagnosed with stress-related disorders were more likely to develop an autoimmune disease, but was unable to provide proof of a directly causal relationship.

Anxiety: What it is, what to do

Francesca Coltrera

Senior Content Writer, Harvard Health Publishing

Some anxiety in your life is normal and may be beneficial, but a response to anxiety that is out of proportion to the cause or source can be an indicator of an anxiety disorder. There are a variety of treatments for anxiety, and often the most effective approach is a combination of different methods.

“Me time” sounds good, but when exactly?

Steve Calechman

Contributor

All parents know how difficult it is to find time for themselves, and probably feel guilty about it when they do, but it’s important to take a break from your responsibilities, even if it’s for only a few minutes a day.