Safety

Keeping children safe this holiday season

Claire McCarthy, MD
Claire McCarthy, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

The best holiday is one that’s free of any unexpected injuries or illnesses. Taking some simple precautions can help you and your family have a safe and fun holiday season.

Researchers may have discovered a cause of multiple sclerosis

Robert H. Shmerling, MD
Robert H. Shmerling, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Looking for possible causes of multiple sclerosis, researchers found that people who had a concussion prior to age 20 had a greater risk of developing MS, suggesting head injuries are a risk factor.

How smart are you about car seats?

Claire McCarthy, MD
Claire McCarthy, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

How much do you know about car seats, and the guidelines for their safe use in your car? Our quiz has the answers.

Ticks and the changing landscape of tick-borne illnesses

Wynne Armand, MD
Wynne Armand, MD, Contributing Editor

Ticks are being found in more places, and they are carrying newly discovered bacteria, meaning it’s more important than ever to protect yourself and your family when you are outdoors.

6 ways to keep your child safe this summer

Claire McCarthy, MD
Claire McCarthy, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

With all the outdoor activities available to kids during the summer, it’s a good idea to take a moment to consider these tips to make sure everyone plays and stays safe.

Think your child has a penicillin allergy? Maybe not.

Claire McCarthy, MD
Claire McCarthy, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Because diagnosis of drug allergies is often done based on symptoms but without testing, many people who believe they are allergic to antibiotics such as penicillin do not in fact have the allergy.

Stay safe in (and on) the water

Celia Smoak Spell
Celia Smoak Spell, Assistant Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Pools, beaches, and boats are great ways to enjoy leisure time in the summer. Following some simple precautions will make your water activities safer for everyone.

Fainting: Frightening, but seldom serious

Julie Corliss
Julie Corliss, Executive Editor, Harvard Heart Letter

While frightening, fainting is not always serious, though it’s important to be aware that it may be a sign of an underlying problem with the blood vessels or heart.

Asking saves lives: A simple question can keep children safe from gun injury

Claire McCarthy, MD
Claire McCarthy, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Although talking about guns is difficult and can be awkward, putting children’s safety first means asking if there are loaded guns in any place your child plays.

Room sharing with your baby may help prevent SIDS—but it means everyone gets less sleep

Claire McCarthy, MD
Claire McCarthy, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Having a baby sleep in the same room as its parents can help with feeding and safety, but will probably result in less sleep for everyone. Parents have to decide when it makes sense to move a baby to its own room.