Pain Management

Long-term use of opioids may depend on the doctor who prescribes them

Scott Weiner, MD
Scott Weiner, MD, Contributor

With opioid addiction such a serious problem, new research indicates that some doctors are more likely to prescribe opioids to their patients than others, and those patients are more likely to end up taking these medications long term. That means it is crucial for consumers to educate themselves about the risks of taking opiates, and to consider alternative medications and treatments if possible.

Can you virtually improve your knee pain?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD
Robert H. Shmerling, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publications

A study of people with osteoarthritis of the knee found that at the end of the study period, those participants who received more personalized attention via the web (including physical therapy sessions and information about pain management) had less pain and better movement function.

Some medications don’t help back pain as much as we thought

Robert H. Shmerling, MD
Robert H. Shmerling, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publications

With back pain affecting so many of us, it’s eye-opening that a new review of dozens of studies is reporting that many people who took NSAID medications did not feel any better, or felt only slightly better, after treatment.

Unlocking the lock jaw: Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) dysfunction

Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS

Most of us don’t appreciate the temporomandibular joint. It’s what lets us upon and close our mouths. Eating, chatting, yelling at a football game. Life just isn’t the same when there is a problem with this joint. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ) is painful and can worsen existing headache disorders. Learn more about TMJ, how to prevent it and how to treat it.

Anti-inflammatory medications and the risk for cardiovascular disease: A new study, a new perspective

Robert H. Shmerling, MD
Robert H. Shmerling, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publications

The results of a large study of the anti-inflammatory medication celecoxib in people with arthritis and increased risk for cardiovascular disease are changing previously held beliefs regarding the drug raising the risk of heart attack or stroke.

Shining a light on migraine relief

Michaela Kane
Michaela Kane, Contributor

Migraine headaches affect millions of people, and one of the most common symptoms is sensitivity to light. A study tested the reactions of migraine sufferers to different colors of light, and found that some people said one specific color eased their pain somewhat.

Saving lives by prescribing naloxone with opioid painkillers

Sarah Wakeman, MD, FASAM, Medical Director, Massachusetts General Hospital Substance Use Disorder Initiative

Unintentional opioid overdose is now the leading cause of accidental death in the United States. These drugs are prescribed to patients to help relieve pain, but overdoses happen because opioids can also depress breathing, sometimes stopping it altogether. But naloxone, also called Narcan, can help reverse the effects of an overdose. If doctors prescribe naloxone at the same time as opioids, overdose deaths may decrease.

Knee replacement: Life changing or a disappointment?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD
Robert H. Shmerling, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publications

Osteoarthritis, the “wear and tear” form of arthritis, can cause pain and restricted movement in the joints. Joint replacement surgery (typically for knees and hips) can restore mobility and reduce pain. However, these procedures involve risk, recovery and rehabilitation time, and the joint may still not feel completely normal. However, for some, surgery may improve quality of life and be better than the alternatives.

Marijuana: Health effects of recreational and medical use

Wynne Armand, MD
Wynne Armand, MD, Contributing Editor

Regardless of whether or not marijuana is legal, using it can have long-term health effects, especially in those who are heavy users. Marijuana shows promise for treating certain medical conditions and symptoms, and further potential benefits are still being studied.

Words matter: The language of addiction and life-saving treatments

Sarah Wakeman, MD, FASAM, Medical Director, Massachusetts General Hospital Substance Use Disorder Initiative

The challenges of drug addiction are compounded by stigmatizing language and incorrect perceptions about the medications used in addiction treatment. Viewing addiction as a disease and likening it to other chronic diseases can help remove the negative connotations from the illness.