Injuries

When lockdown is not actually safer: Intimate partner violence during COVID-19

Eve Valera, PhD

Contributor

For women living with abusive partners, the COVID-19 pandemic has made an already difficult and dangerous situation even worse. And even if a woman had been thinking about leaving an abusive situation or planning to leave, with current restrictions she may not be able to.

Knee arthroscopy: Should this common knee surgery be performed less often?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Senior Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

There is already evidence that knee arthroscopy for osteoarthritis does not help most people. A study attempted to determine if the results would be better for people with osteoarthritis and a torn meniscus.

Preventing falls in older adults: Multiple strategies are better

Brad Manor, PhD

Contributor

Falls among older adults are on the rise, but most are preventable. To do this, interventions must target the multiple factors that contribute to falls, taking steps to minimize them or prevent them entirely.

Keeping children safe around cosmetics

Claire McCarthy, MD

Senior Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Between 2002 and 2016, over 4,000 children under 5 were treated each year in US emergency departments for cosmetics-related injuries. Take precautions with your cosmetic products to keep children safe.

When your child ends up in the emergency room

Steve Calechman

Contributor

Visiting an emergency room with a sick or injured child is a universally stressful experience. Knowing what to tell the doctor, and what questions to ask, can help you keep your head and make the situation easier to handle.

Do we need to take tackling out of youth football?

Claire McCarthy, MD

Senior Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Ongoing research on the effects of repeated head injury on the brains of football players raises the question of whether preteen football players should be prohibited from tackling.

Are you taking too much anti-inflammatory medication?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Senior Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are widely used and generally safe, but they can cause problems, especially if the recommended dosage is exceeded. A new study found that a significant percentage of people were doing this, sometimes intentionally but not always.

Researchers may have discovered a cause of multiple sclerosis

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Senior Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Looking for possible causes of multiple sclerosis, researchers found that people who had a concussion prior to age 20 had a greater risk of developing MS, suggesting head injuries are a risk factor.

How smart are you about car seats?

Claire McCarthy, MD

Senior Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

How much do you know about car seats, and the guidelines for their safe use in your car? Our quiz has the answers.

Too many pain pills after surgery: When good intentions go awry

Scott Weiner, MD

Contributor

The opioid epidemic has had a devastating effect on lives. There are many factors behind this crisis, some of which may be surprising. A reasonable and well-intentioned effort to reduce and relieve pain can inadvertently lead to a potentially life-threatening addiction, but there are some surprisingly simple ways to avoid such scenarios.