Healthy Aging

Aging and sleep: Making changes for brain health

Sleep is a necessity for everyone, but it’s especially important for older people to be aware of the changes in sleep patterns that accompany aging, and the effect that poor sleep can have on brain health.

Post-hospital syndrome: Tips to keep yourself or a loved one healthy after hospitalization

Post-hospital syndrome is a period of vulnerability after a patient is discharged from the hospital that leaves a person at increased risk for rehospitalization. Patients and their loved ones can take steps to minimize or prevent effects of post-hospital syndrome.

Multigenerational fitness parks

That playground you like to visit with your kids or grandkids may be morphing into a space that is “fun for the whole family” — fitness parks with exercise equipment suitable for people of all ages alongside the more typical child-focused play structures.

Skin serum: What it can and can’t do

Women concerned about the effects of aging on their skin may want to consider a skin serum, which is a concentrated formulation containing vitamins, antioxidants, and other ingredients.

Memories: Learning, remembering, (not) forgetting

Who we are and how we define our lives is built on the accumulation of personal experiences. As we age, these memories start to fade. People with neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease are especially vulnerable.

What kinds of exercise are good for brain health?

While the physical benefits of exercise have long been understood, exactly which exercises boost brain health is less clear, but the more diverse your exercise routine, the more likely your brain and cognitive health will benefit along with your body.

Overcome exercise excuses

Only slightly more than half of adults are getting the recommended amount of exercise. While some have pain or a chronic health condition, and others are just busy, it’s not difficult to add regular activity to your daily routine.

Can DNA markers predict aging?

A newly available test offers to provide information about your telomeres, parts of your DNA that are considered markers of aging, but on its own this information is of little value, and you can make beneficial lifestyle changes without paying for a test.

I’m so lonesome I could cry

The health risks of loneliness and isolation have been known for some time, but more recently research has shown the specific effects in the brain. Finding ways to make connections with other people is the best “medicine” to alleviate the mental and physical effects of loneliness.

The story of your life and the power of memoir

Matthew Solan

Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

Growing older can bring feelings of a loss of self, but making the effort to create a record of your life can be a therapeutic pursuit, and can also be welcomed and appreciated by other family members.