Exercise and Fitness

Can exercise extend your life?

Better health and more time: a long-term study of people who took a treadmill test suggests better fitness lengthens lives at every age.

Stretching: Less pain, other gains

Stay flexible by adding simple stretches to your day and fitness routine. Stretching aids balance and posture, and helps prevent pain and injury.

Fat is more than calorie storage

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Researchers found that giving overweight mice a specific protein improved their metabolism, but point out that humans also produce this protein, and that exercise achieves the same result in people.

Should you try kettlebells?

Looking for a way to add variety to your workouts? Consider kettlebells. Kettlebell exercises work several muscle groups at a time, and can help improve posture and balance as well.

The rise of push-ups: A classic exercise that can help you get stronger

Matthew Solan

Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

Basic push-ups engage your body from top to bottom. They work several muscle groups at once including the arms, chest, abdomen (core), hips, and legs. How many you can do at one time offers a simple way to evaluate your strength and muscular endurance and is an easy tool to help you improve. To find your starting point, perform as many push-ups as you can with good form.

Heart disease and breast cancer: Can women cut risk for both?

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

While they share many risk factors, far more women are living with heart disease than with breast cancer. Exercise and a healthy diet can cut a woman’s risk for both.

6 steps toward a successful exercise resolution

Many people want to be more active, but don’t follow through on their fitness goals. First reflect on your reasons for wanting to exercise, and what’s holding you back from doing it. Then create a plan that is realistic and fits into your life.

Can exercise help conquer addiction?

Claire Twark, MD

Contributor

As the US contends with the ongoing opioid epidemic, the idea that exercise can help people cope with and ultimately overcome addiction is gaining traction. Exercise helps provide structure and focus, helps treat mental health issues related to substance use, and can bring together individuals with a common goal.

The new exercise guidelines: Any changes for you?

Lauren Elson, MD

Contributor

What do the new government guidelines for exercise and physical activity mean for you? It depends on your age and ability, but overall, move more, sit less.

Understanding and improving core strength

Lauren Elson, MD

Contributor

Learning to find your core, and finding the right exercises to increase your core strength, is valuable at any age, but especially as you get older, a strong ore can help prevent injuries and maintain independence.