Diabetes

Rethinking A1c goals for type 2 diabetes

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

New guidance from the American College of Physicians updates the approach to controlling blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes, with more emphasis on finding an appropriate goal for each individual patient, rather than just working toward a number without regard for a patient’s needs.

Racial and ethnic minority communities hit hard by type 2 diabetes: Here’s what we can do

As the number of people with diabetes continues to climb, the problem is especially acute for members of many ethnic and racial minority communities. Greater awareness of this situation is required to bring improved care and treatment to everyone who needs it.

Minorías raciales/étnicas seriamente afectadas por diabetes tipo 2: Esto es lo que podemos hacer

El número de personas con diabetes y sus complicaciones sigue en aumento, particularmente en las minorías étnicas/raciales. Hace falta más conciencia de la naturaleza de este problema para mejorar los servicios de salud que se ofrecen a estos grupos.

Can an online game really improve blood sugar control for people with diabetes?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Participation in an online game could lead to better control of blood sugar in people with poorly controlled diabetes, according to newly published research.

Diabetes: Adding lifestyle changes to medication can deliver a knockout punch

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Plenty of research supports the common-sense notion that a healthy lifestyle can prevent or treat many diseases. A diet high in fruits, veggies, whole grains, and plant protein and low in processed carbs, added sugars, saturated fats; regular physical activity; and emotional well-being are the potent treatments that can prevent the need for or even […]

Type 2 diabetes: Value of home blood sugar monitoring unclear

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

A small study suggests that routine home testing of blood sugar may not improve control or quality of life. However, more and longer studies are needed to know whether the results apply to all individuals with type 2 diabetes.

Could artificial sweeteners be bad for your brain?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

While diet soda and other types of artificially sweetened drinks may not have calories, research is suggesting that those who drink them regularly may be at higher risk for stroke or dementia.

What is prediabetes and why does it matter?

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Considering the range and severity of health problems caused by diabetes, the focus on treating prediabetes in order to prevent it from becoming diabetes is sensible, and a large study found that it is possible. A healthy diet and adequate physical activity can help most people side step this condition. For some, medication is also necessary.

The data are in: Eat right, reduce your risk of diabetes

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Data from surveys of 200,000 people spanning two decades add support to the belief that eating a diet made up largely of plant-based foods is likely to lower a person’s risk of developing diabetes.

There’s no sugar-coating it: All calories are not created equal

Celia Smoak Spell

Assistant Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

The view that calories are calories regardless of their source has been shown to be outdated. Foods with a low glycemic index are better because they tend to raise blood sugar more slowly, and they are also more likely to be healthier foods overall. By choosing the low-glycemic foods and thus the minimally processed foods, people can lose more weight, feel fuller longer, and remain healthier.