Cancer

Cancer treatment: Is a clinical trial right for you?

Some people undergoing cancer treatment may be eligible to participate in a clinical trial of a new drug or therapy. These trials help determine whether a new approach is more effective than standard treatment.

Just do it… yourself: At-home colorectal cancer screening

Colonoscopy remains the best way to detect colorectal cancer, but there are at-home screening tests that do not involve the pre-test bowel clearing that many find uncomfortable.

Fear of cancer recurrence: Mind-body tools offer hope

As the number of cancer survivors continues to grow, many continue to worry for years after treatment ends about a recurrence of the disease. These people need post-treatment support, and mind-body techniques offer a promising solution.

Preserving fertility during cancer treatments

Cancer treatments –– and some cancers –– can affect fertility in both women and men. Variables include age at diagnosis, type of cancer, and type of treatment. If you’re wondering about options for preserving fertility, discuss this with your treatment team.

Alternative therapies for cancer

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

A study of two million people receiving cancer treatment found that those who chose a complementary treatment along with conventional treatment had less successful outcomes (did not live as long).

Immunotherapy: What you need to know

Immunotherapy has emerged as a viable treatment option for some advanced cancers. People considering it — and even people who have had it — have many questions.

New blood test may someday help guide the best treatment for aggressive prostate cancer

Charlie Schmidt

Editor, Harvard Medical School Annual Report on Prostate Diseases

Research in a small group of men with advanced prostate cancer found that a blood test that screens for a certain genetic mutation could help decide which of two types of drugs would be more likely to provide a longer lifespan.

Exercise as part of cancer treatment

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Based on analyses of multiple studies showing benefits of exercise, Australia’s national cancer organization has issued formal guidelines recommending exercise as part of cancer treatment for all cancer patients. The guidelines emphasize that exercise recommendations be tailored to each patient.

Chondroitin and melanoma: How worried should you be?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Research in mice found that the supplement chondroitin sulfate led to the growth of melanoma cells, and though this does not mean it will do the same in people, there isn’t much evidence to support taking chondroitin anyway.

4 ways to protect against skin cancer (other than sunscreen)

While sunscreen is essential for skin protection when spending time outdoors, there are other options (lifestyle modifications and over-the-counter products) that can help lower your risk of skin cancer.