Cancer

Colorectal cancer screening before age 50?

While the incidence of colorectal cancer has declined among older adults, it has increased in people younger than 50. The American Cancer Society now recommends that adults be screened for this condition starting at age 45.

I see you –– but don’t ask me how I’m doing

The common American casual greeting is an almost-automatic behavior, a superficial form of friendliness. But when someone says, “How are you?” how many of us really think about the question, or the answer?

Topical treatment helps prevent actinic keratosis from developing into skin cancer

Actinic keratoses are scaly areas on the skin that, if left untreated, may develop into squamous cell skin cancers. A recent study compared several topical treatments used by dermatologists to treat this condition.

Cancer treatment: Is a clinical trial right for you?

Some people undergoing cancer treatment may be eligible to participate in a clinical trial of a new drug or therapy. These trials help determine whether a new approach is more effective than standard treatment.

Just do it… yourself: At-home colorectal cancer screening

Colonoscopy remains the best way to detect colorectal cancer, but there are at-home screening tests that do not involve the pre-test bowel clearing that many find uncomfortable.

Fear of cancer recurrence: Mind-body tools offer hope

As the number of cancer survivors continues to grow, many continue to worry for years after treatment ends about a recurrence of the disease. These people need post-treatment support, and mind-body techniques offer a promising solution.

Preserving fertility during cancer treatments

Cancer treatments –– and some cancers –– can affect fertility in both women and men. Variables include age at diagnosis, type of cancer, and type of treatment. If you’re wondering about options for preserving fertility, discuss this with your treatment team.

Alternative therapies for cancer

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

A study of two million people receiving cancer treatment found that those who chose a complementary treatment along with conventional treatment had less successful outcomes (did not live as long).

Immunotherapy: What you need to know

Immunotherapy has emerged as a viable treatment option for some advanced cancers. People considering it — and even people who have had it — have many questions.

New blood test may someday help guide the best treatment for aggressive prostate cancer

Charlie Schmidt

Editor, Harvard Medical School Annual Report on Prostate Diseases

Research in a small group of men with advanced prostate cancer found that a blood test that screens for a certain genetic mutation could help decide which of two types of drugs would be more likely to provide a longer lifespan.