Behavioral Health

Diet and depression

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Research has shown that what we eat matters for every aspect of our health, including our mental health, and found that a healthy diet was associated with a significantly lower risk of developing symptoms of depression.

How to welcome back a colleague who is in recovery

Peter Grinspoon, MD

Contributing Editor

If a colleague has been absent from work for treatment of a substance use disorder, that person’s return to work may be awkward or uncomfortable, and coworkers may feel similarly. Empathy, understanding, and a willingness to listen will help returning workers feel welcomed back.

“Me time” sounds good, but when exactly?

Steve Calechman

Contributor

All parents know how difficult it is to find time for themselves, and probably feel guilty about it when they do, but it’s important to take a break from your responsibilities, even if it’s for only a few minutes a day.

When gambling might be a problem

Excessive gambling is now recognized as an addictive disorder by the American Psychological Association. Asking yourself if gambling has adversely affected your life is a good way to determine whether it’s a problem that needs treatment.

Why teenagers eat Tide pods

Claire McCarthy, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

It’s difficult to understand why teenagers would willingly engage in risky behavior like the Tide Pod Challenge. It’s due to the combination of young brains that are still growing and forming, the need to learn to take risks, and the attention and pressure from social media.

5 common problems that can mimic ADHD

Claire McCarthy, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

While the incidence of ADHD in children has climbed, behavior or concentration problems in a child do not automatically mean that child has ADHD. Doctors and parents should consider these other possible causes when evaluating a child.

Preventing overdose deaths is not one-size-fits-all

Scott Weiner, MD

Contributor

An analysis of overdose deaths in the United States from 2000 to 2015 showed differences in death rates between racial and ethnic groups, and serves as a reminder that different parts of the population have been affected by the opioid epidemic in different ways, and treatment initiatives should reflect these variables.

Answer these 5 questions to help make your New Year’s resolutions stick

If you want to keep your New Year’s resolutions, you need to approach them as a process of behavior change, make your goals realistic, and have a specific plan for how you will reach them.

Remembering the “me” in merry: Self-care strategies for this holiday season

As much fun as the holiday season can be, it’s also stressful for many people, and some find it difficult to feel joyful. Taking time amidst the rush to focus on your own feelings and needs can help relieve some of the stress and make the season more pleasant.

Navigating the holidays in recovery

Peter Grinspoon, MD

Contributing Editor

While the holiday season is a time of festivities and reconnecting with family, for people in recovery from substance use disorders, these specific situations and events can be especially stressful. For them it’s crucial to plan ahead and to make sure recovery remains the priority at all times.