Behavioral Health

The story of your life and the power of memoir

Matthew Solan

Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

Growing older can bring feelings of a loss of self, but making the effort to create a record of your life can be a therapeutic pursuit, and can also be welcomed and appreciated by other family members.

Can you rewire your brain to get out of a rut? (Yes you can…)

Srini Pillay, MD


We’ve all had times when we feel like we are in a rut. This can happen because of the brain’s built-in tendency to follow established patterns. But now researchers have shown that it’s possible to undo established ways of thinking, opening a pathway to increased creativity.

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS): Hope for stubborn depression

For some people suffering from depression, medications and therapy don’t bring adequate relief. A newer treatment called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applies powerful magnetic fields to areas of the brain known to be involved in depression. It is well-tolerated and shows promise in helping patients with hard-to-treat depression.

Diet and depression

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Research has shown that what we eat matters for every aspect of our health, including our mental health, and found that a healthy diet was associated with a significantly lower risk of developing symptoms of depression.

How to welcome back a colleague who is in recovery

Peter Grinspoon, MD

Contributing Editor

If a colleague has been absent from work for treatment of a substance use disorder, that person’s return to work may be awkward or uncomfortable, and coworkers may feel similarly. Empathy, understanding, and a willingness to listen will help returning workers feel welcomed back.

“Me time” sounds good, but when exactly?

Steve Calechman


All parents know how difficult it is to find time for themselves, and probably feel guilty about it when they do, but it’s important to take a break from your responsibilities, even if it’s for only a few minutes a day.

When gambling might be a problem

Excessive gambling is now recognized as an addictive disorder by the American Psychological Association. Asking yourself if gambling has adversely affected your life is a good way to determine whether it’s a problem that needs treatment.

Why teenagers eat Tide pods

Claire McCarthy, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

It’s difficult to understand why teenagers would willingly engage in risky behavior like the Tide Pod Challenge. It’s due to the combination of young brains that are still growing and forming, the need to learn to take risks, and the attention and pressure from social media.

5 common problems that can mimic ADHD

Claire McCarthy, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

While the incidence of ADHD in children has climbed, behavior or concentration problems in a child do not automatically mean that child has ADHD. Doctors and parents should consider these other possible causes when evaluating a child.

Preventing overdose deaths is not one-size-fits-all

Scott Weiner, MD


An analysis of overdose deaths in the United States from 2000 to 2015 showed differences in death rates between racial and ethnic groups, and serves as a reminder that different parts of the population have been affected by the opioid epidemic in different ways, and treatment initiatives should reflect these variables.