Behavioral Health

The psychology of Internet rage

Why do so many people express themselves online in ways they would seemingly be unlikely to in a face-to-face setting? The explanation for Internet rage involves anonymity, knowledge of subject matter and personal identification with it, and perception of content versus what it is actually saying.

Trauma-informed care: What it is, and why it’s important

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Because medical exams are invasive, and because many people have experienced some form of trauma and may be uncomfortable with aspects of the exam, healthcare providers should approach care with consideration for what patients may have experienced.

Chronic pain and childhood trauma

Laura Kiesel

Contributor

As it becomes more apparent that there is a connection between childhood trauma and physical and emotional health problems in adults, treatment approaches that acknowledge this link are likely to be more effective on both sides.

Good news: Fewer teens are being bullied

Claire McCarthy, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Data from the US Department of Education show a decline in teens being bullied over the past decade, in part because schools have worked hard to define the behavior and make it clear it will not be tolerated.

Choosing the right mental health provider

Different types of mental health providers offer different types of treatments, and any treatment needs to be tailored to an individual’s needs. Understanding the differences between types of providers is the first step to finding the treatment that is best for you.

I’m so lonesome I could cry

The health risks of loneliness and isolation have been known for some time, but more recently research has shown the specific effects in the brain. Finding ways to make connections with other people is the best “medicine” to alleviate the mental and physical effects of loneliness.

The story of your life and the power of memoir

Matthew Solan

Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

Growing older can bring feelings of a loss of self, but making the effort to create a record of your life can be a therapeutic pursuit, and can also be welcomed and appreciated by other family members.

Can you rewire your brain to get out of a rut? (Yes you can…)

Srini Pillay, MD

Contributor

We’ve all had times when we feel like we are in a rut. This can happen because of the brain’s built-in tendency to follow established patterns. But now researchers have shown that it’s possible to undo established ways of thinking, opening a pathway to increased creativity.

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS): Hope for stubborn depression

For some people suffering from depression, medications and therapy don’t bring adequate relief. A newer treatment called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applies powerful magnetic fields to areas of the brain known to be involved in depression. It is well-tolerated and shows promise in helping patients with hard-to-treat depression.

Diet and depression

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Research has shown that what we eat matters for every aspect of our health, including our mental health, and found that a healthy diet was associated with a significantly lower risk of developing symptoms of depression.