Anxiety and Depression

Depression: Common medication side effect?

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Many medications list depression or suicidal thoughts as a possible side effect, even those for unrelated conditions like high blood pressure or allergies. A recent study found that these side effects may be more prevalent than previously believed, particularly among those taking multiple medications with these side effects.

Anxiety: What it is, what to do

Francesca Coltrera

Senior Content Writer, Harvard Health Publishing

Some anxiety in your life is normal and may be beneficial, but a response to anxiety that is out of proportion to the cause or source can be an indicator of an anxiety disorder. There are a variety of treatments for anxiety, and often the most effective approach is a combination of different methods.

I’m so lonesome I could cry

The health risks of loneliness and isolation have been known for some time, but more recently research has shown the specific effects in the brain. Finding ways to make connections with other people is the best “medicine” to alleviate the mental and physical effects of loneliness.

Eating well to help manage anxiety: Your questions answered

Uma Naidoo, MD

Contributor

Paying closer attention to diet is important for people with anxiety. Making dietary changes in favor of a balanced diet that emphasizes whole, unprocessed foods and minimizes added sugars helps smooth out the highs and lows that can contribute to anxiety.

In children and teens, depression doesn’t always look like sadness

Claire McCarthy, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Aside from the more common behavioral indicators that a person may be depressed, there are several other changes in behavior that can be signs of depression in children and teens. If you notice any of these, consult a doctor or a mental health professional for advice.

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS): Hope for stubborn depression

For some people suffering from depression, medications and therapy don’t bring adequate relief. A newer treatment called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applies powerful magnetic fields to areas of the brain known to be involved in depression. It is well-tolerated and shows promise in helping patients with hard-to-treat depression.

Diet and depression

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Research has shown that what we eat matters for every aspect of our health, including our mental health, and found that a healthy diet was associated with a significantly lower risk of developing symptoms of depression.

Write your anxieties away

Srini Pillay, MD

Contributor

Research into people who struggle with anxiety suggests that free-form writing specifically about their concerns may help the brain use its resources to better focus on challenging tasks.

Feeling okay about feeling bad is good for your mental health

A trio of studies investigated the connection between the ability to accept the negative emotions generated by stressful situations and a person’s long-term psychological health.

Yoga could complement traditional treatment for depression

Marlynn Wei, MD, JD

Contributing Editor

New research suggests that yoga may help with depression when used alongside traditional treatment. Evidence does not recommend any specific styles of yoga, so you can see which style fits best with you and your preferences. Yoga has also been shown to help those with mild depression, but more research is needed to be certain.