Fertility

Infertility: Other people’s pregnancies

Ellen S. Glazer, LICSW

Guest Contributor

One challenge for people with fertility issues is navigating other people’s pregnancies. Support and coping strategies can help maintain relationships.

Infertility: Maintaining privacy, avoiding secrecy

Ellen S. Glazer, LICSW

Guest Contributor

Couples coping with infertility also have to decide what to tell family and friends about their situation. It’s possible to preserve privacy by offering a simple truth without unnecessary detail.

Preserving fertility during cancer treatments

Cancer treatments –– and some cancers –– can affect fertility in both women and men. Variables include age at diagnosis, type of cancer, and type of treatment. If you’re wondering about options for preserving fertility, discuss this with your treatment team.

Fertility and diet: Is there a connection?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Research continues to explore the connection between fertility and diet. There is some evidence that what you eat can help increase your chances of getting pregnant, but right now the specific advice is simple. If you’re trying to conceive, eat a basic healthy diet, take prenatal vitamins, and talk with your doctor for preconception advice.

Infertility may raise risk of aggressive prostate cancer

Nancy Ferrari

Senior editor, Harvard Health

A 2010 study of more than 22,500 California men found that being infertile significantly raised the risk of developing aggressive disease.

Can a vasectomy increase prostate cancer risk?

Nancy Ferrari

Senior editor, Harvard Health

Experts conclude that there is no association between vasectomy and prostate cancer risk.