Nancy Ferrari

Nancy Ferrari is a managing editor at Harvard Health Publishing and a former editor of the Harvard Heart Letter. Before joining Harvard Health, Nancy was a writer and editor in the Clinical Publications Program at Harvard Pilgrim Health Care.  She began her work there as a women's health writer creating patient education materials and then became the manager of the program.  Nancy's writing and editing experience includes work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she worked at the Journal of Science, Technology, and Human Values and served as editor of a conference proceedings on energy and the environment.


Posts by Nancy Ferrari

Kindergarten redshirting is popular, but is it necessary?

Nancy Ferrari
Nancy Ferrari, Senior editor, Harvard Health

More and more parents are “redshirting” their young ones. That’s the practice of not starting a child in kindergarten until after his or her sixth birthday. Ann Densmore, EdD, an expert in language and social communication skills in children and co-author of Your Successful Preschooler, said parents do this to gain competitive advantages for their children and as a response to the shift in what kindergarten is. You can help prepare your children for kindergarten by ensuring there is adequate facilitated play in preschool. On the community level, talk with teachers, principals, and other parents. Challenge school committees. And realize that starting kindergarten is a new beginning for a child and his or her parents.

Is there a link between diet soda and heart disease?

Nancy Ferrari
Nancy Ferrari, Senior editor, Harvard Health

I’m a big fan of diet soda. I like the taste, and I love that it doesn’t have any calories. I can drink two or three diet sodas a day and not worry about gaining weight. But a new study has me wondering if enjoying the sweetness of soda without the sugar and calories is such a good thing after all. University of Miami and Columbia University researchers found that daily diet soda drinkers were more likely to have had a stroke or heart attack over the course of a 10-year study, or to have died from vascular disease, as folks who didn’t imbibe diet soda. My husband gently (but persistently) tells me there is nothing good about drinking diet soda, not even the taste I claim to enjoy so much. The evidence seems to be backing him up.

How drug shortages happen

Nancy Ferrari
Nancy Ferrari, Senior editor, Harvard Health

Worrisome shortages of important medications—from drugs to manage the symptoms of ADHD to standard cancer drugs—have been in the headlines lately. A shortage can be frightening to the people who need a hard-to-get medication, and frustrating for the clinicians who prescribe it. Manufacturing and quality control issues are among the primary reasons for drug shortages. The FDA can sometimes help ease a drug shortage. What can you do if you are affected? Ask your doctor if another medication might work for you. Be especially wary of Internet or faxed advertisements for alternatives (often highly priced and sometimes counterfeit).