Hope Ricciotti, MD

Hope A. Ricciotti, MD, is Editor in Chief of the Harvard Women's Health Watch. She is an Associate Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology at Harvard Medical School and leads the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.


Posts by Hope Ricciotti, MD

Miscarriage: Keep breaking the silence

Hope Ricciotti, MD

Editor in Chief, Harvard Women's Health Watch

Many public figures have begun speaking up about their experiences with miscarriage. While it’s wonderful that they’re breaking the silence, a recent survey has revealed that the general public still has a lot of misconceptions about this surprisingly common event. Dr. Hope Ricciotti shares her reactions to the survey results, and her advice to women experiencing miscarriage.

Premenstrual dysphoric disorder: When it’s more than just PMS

Hope Ricciotti, MD

Editor in Chief, Harvard Women's Health Watch

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) share physical symptoms, but the psychological and emotional symptoms of PMDD are much more severe. No woman should struggle with debilitating symptoms associated with her menstrual cycle. Carefully tracking symptoms and having a discussion with your doctor, as well as trying one of several medications available to treat these conditions, can pave the way to relief.

“Not Again!” — When UTIs won’t quit at midlife

Hope Ricciotti, MD

Editor in Chief, Harvard Women's Health Watch

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) occur in women of all ages. Physical and hormonal changes can leave women at midlife particularly vulnerable. No woman should have to put up with the inconvenience and discomfort of recurrent UTIs. Self-help measures can be effective, but if they don’t do the trick, see your doctor. He or she can identify and treat any underlying problems and recommend other strategies to keep UTIs at bay.

It’s NOT a “pink Viagra”

Hope Ricciotti, MD

Editor in Chief, Harvard Women's Health Watch

Women of all ages have questions and concerns about their sex lives. These issues often come up after having a baby, during perimenopause, and well into later life, too. Women’s sexuality is very complex. Brain chemistry, mood, hormones, and the nature of a woman’s relationship with her sexual partner are all important influences. This week, the FDA approved the drug flibanserin for treatment of low sex drive in premenopausal women. This drug is no “pink Viagra,” and its effect on women’s sexual function may be small, but it may be a step in the right direction simply because it draws attention to the value of a satisfying sex life for women and acknowledges it as a legitimate health concern.