Archive for May, 2021

Is IBD an underrecognized health problem in minority groups?

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a treatable condition once considered a disease that largely affects people who are white, although in recent years it has been diagnosed more often in other racial and ethnic groups, in the US and around the world. Recognizing this condition early can make a difference in care and quality of life.

Sickle cell disease in newborns and children: What families should know and do

Claire McCarthy, MD

Senior Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Millions of people around the world have sickle cell disease, a genetic condition that can cause pain and damage to organs or tissues, and can make children more susceptible to other health problems. In the US, most cases are diagnosed through screening in newborns. Getting connected to the proper care early in a child’s life can help prevent complications from the disease.

COVID-19 vaccines for children and teens: What we do — and don’t — know

Every day, more and more adults are getting vaccinated against COVID-19, helping us build toward herd immunity. But what about children and teens? What is the status of research on the vaccines in these groups, and when might vaccines be available for them?

Happy trails: Take a hike, now

Matthew Solan

Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

After too much time spent indoors (and probably less active than is healthy), getting outside and taking a hike is a great way to get some exercise while enjoying nature. But before you hit the trail, make sure you’re well prepared.

Sleep well — and reduce your risk of dementia and death

Although it has been known for some time that individuals with dementia frequently have poor, fragmented sleep, two new studies suggest that if you don’t get enough sleep in midlife, you are at increased risk for dementia later in life.