Archive for September, 2019

Intensive blood sugar control doesn’t have lasting cardiovascular benefits for those with diabetes

Medha Munshi, MD

Contributor

A recent 15-year follow-up to the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial found that short-term intensive blood sugar control did not lead to significant reduction of risk of cardiovascular events in the long term.

Adult acne: Understanding underlying causes and banishing breakouts

Just because you’re an adult doesn’t mean you are no longer susceptible to acne. Diet, medications, personal care products, stress, and a woman’s menstrual cycle can all contribute to acne production. Fortunately, there are many treatment options available.

Common hormonal treatments linked to abnormal heart rhythms and sudden death in men being treated for prostate cancer

Charlie Schmidt

Editor, Harvard Medical School Annual Report on Prostate Diseases

Treatments for advanced prostate cancer that suppress testosterone, a hormone (also called an androgen) that drives the malignant cells to grow and spread, are collectively referred to as androgen deprivation therapies, or ADT. These therapies can significantly extend lifespans in men who have the disease, but they also have a range of challenging side effects. […]

Harvard Health Ad Watch: What you should know about direct-to-consumer ads

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Direct-to-consumer advertising for health treatments pops up everywhere, yet the information shared is often incomplete, confusing, or biased. Our new Ad Watch series will help you understand adspeak and when to be wary.

New medication advances treatment for chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps

The FDA has approved a new medication for the treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps, dupilumab, which is given by injection biweekly.

Does Botox reduce the frequency of chronic migraine?

Paul Rizzoli, MD

Contributor

People who experience chronic migraine headaches may benefit from treatment with botulimun neurotoxin (Botox), though other treatments such as medication are usually tried first.

Want to travel back in time? Use episodic memory

When people refer to “memory,” they often mean episodic memory, a complex brain process that enables recall of details like names and route detours –– as well as long-ago moments.

Sleep driving and other unusual practices during sleep

The FDA has issued its most serious category of warning about three sleep medications due to reports of injuries related to their use. Aside from next-day drowsiness, these medications can cause sleep behaviors that may be dangerous.

How racism harms children

Claire McCarthy, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

The American Academy of Pediatrics has issued a policy statement regarding the “socially transmitted disease” of racism. Its negative effects harm children in multiple areas, including education, health care, employment, and the justice system.

Your risk of dementia: Do lifestyle and genetics matter?

Clinical trials for drugs to stop or slow the progression of dementia have not been successful. A recent study attempted to determine how much influence, if any, genetic and lifestyle factors may have on the development of dementia.