Archive for February, 2019

Fat is more than calorie storage

Monique Tello, MD, MPH

Contributing Editor

Researchers found that giving overweight mice a specific protein improved their metabolism, but point out that humans also produce this protein, and that exercise achieves the same result in people.

Can vaping help you quit smoking?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

While the long-term health consequences of using e-cigarettes are still unknown, a study comparing vaping with nicotine replacement therapy found that it may be useful as a tool to help some smokers quit.

Do you really have a penicillin allergy?

Many people who believe they are allergic to penicillin do not in fact have this allergy. Additionally, people who were allergic in the past may no longer be. An allergist can use various tests to determine whether a person has a true allergy.

Diet and exercise limit heart disease risk in men undergoing hormonal treatments for advanced prostate cancer

Charlie Schmidt

Editor, Harvard Medical School Annual Report on Prostate Diseases

Men with advanced prostate cancer are typically treated with drugs that prevent the body from making or using testosterone. A hormone (or an androgen, as it’s known), testosterone drives prostate cancer cells to grow faster, so shutting it down is essential to keeping the illness in check. About 600,000 men with advanced prostate cancer in […]

Infertility: Maintaining privacy, avoiding secrecy

Ellen S. Glazer, LICSW

Guest Contributor

Couples coping with infertility also have to decide what to tell family and friends about their situation. It’s possible to preserve privacy by offering a simple truth without unnecessary detail.

Sweeteners: Time to rethink your choices?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Non-sugar sweeteners are popular, but there have been questions about their safety, so are they worth it? Researchers examined dozens of studies to assess the risks and benefits of various sweeteners available.

Should I be eating more fiber?

Most Americans eat less than half the recommended amount of fiber, even though there’s plenty of evidence showing the many benefits of a fiber-rich diet.

Can facial exercises reverse signs of aging?

A study found that a regimen of daily facial exercises led to fuller cheeks and a more youthful appearance among participants. But its small size makes it difficult to draw conclusions about the longevity of the results.

Should you try kettlebells?

Looking for a way to add variety to your workouts? Consider kettlebells. Kettlebell exercises work several muscle groups at a time, and can help improve posture and balance as well.

Got pain? Get better sleep

Stuart Quan, MD

Contributing Editor

Research has illuminated the intersection between poor sleep and pain, showing that the perception of pain increases after inadequate or poor-quality sleep. This has implications for anyone experiencing pain, and it is also relevant to combatting the opioid crisis.