Archive for October, 2019

Antibiotic-resistant urinary tract infections are on the rise

Lisa Bebell, MD

Contributor

Rising resistance to antibiotics driven by overpresciption and overuse has led to a decline in the effectiveness of antibiotics in treating urinary tract infections. If your doctor wants to prescribe an antibiotic, be sure to ask if it’s necessary, and what alternatives there might be.

Too old for the pediatrician? Time to switch doctors

Claire McCarthy, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Wondering how a teen or young adult can smoothly smoothly transition from seeing a pediatrician to a medical practice that treats adults? Making plans and taking these steps will help.

Should I participate in a cardiac rehabilitation program?

For people who have had a heart attack or heart surgery, or been diagnosed with angina or a specific kind of heart failure, participating in a cardiac rehabilitation program has medically proven benefits to overall health and quality of life.

Ranitidine (Zantac) recall expanded, many questions remain

The FDA has not yet released the results of its testing of the heartburn medication ranitidine. The testing method used by the online pharmacy that originally alerted the FDA may have affected their results.

Gene testing to guide antidepressant treatment: Has its time arrived?

Commercial gene tests claim to offer guidance in choosing appropriate medications to treat depression. As yet, no evidence supports this claim.

Can your CPAP make you sick?

Using a CPAP machine is beneficial for people with obstructive sleep apnea, but if the machine isn’t kept clean it could lead to an illness. There are sanitizing systems available, but cleaning the parts by hand is just as effective.

10 foods that may impact your risk of dying from heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes

Researchers examining data from a national health survey and other sources found that consuming too much, or too little, of 10 foods was associated with 45% of deaths in 2012 due to type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

PrEP prevents HIV — so why aren’t more people taking it?

PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) is a daily medication taken to prevent HIV infection. While multiple studies show PrEP is effective, relatively few of those who might benefit are taking it. Will a 10-year initiative to reduce rates of HIV and a new formulation of PrEP help?

Chronic Lyme arthritis: A mystery solved?

John Ross, MD, FIDSA

Contributing Editor

About 60% of people infected with Lyme disease develop arthritis, and about 10% of those fail to respond to antibiotic treatment for unknown reasons. A new study has found a likely explanation for this medical mystery.

Study supports benefit of statin use for older adults

Statins are known to be effective in reducing risk of cardiovascular disease, but for older adults the guidelines are less clear. A study looking at an older population found that continuing to take statins did have a statistically significant benefit.