Archive for July, 2018

Can cell phone use cause ADHD?

Claire McCarthy, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Researchers found that teenagers who engaged in high-frequency use of various digital media activities were more likely to have symptoms of ADHD. While this is not conclusive, it raises questions about whether too much smartphone use can affect teens’ development and behavior.

Top searches on health topics? It may depend on where you live

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

The results of online searches on health topics vary greatly from state to state, even though common conditions occur everywhere.

New blood test guides researchers toward the best treatment for aggressive prostate cancer

Charlie Schmidt

Editor, Harvard Medical School Annual Report on Prostate Diseases

Tumors that spread, or metastasize, in the body shed cells into blood that doctors can scrutinize for insights into what a patient’s cancer might do. Analyzing these so-called circulating tumor cells (CTCs) isn’t part of routine care yet, in part because they’re so hard to pick out of the millions of normal cells in a […]

CPR: A neglected but important part of fighting the opioid crisis

Naloxone is an important tool in treating someone who has overdosed on opioids, but equally important is knowing CPR, which can keep blood flowing in a person who isn’t breathing until naloxone takes effect.

Belly fat linked with higher heart disease risk

Too much fat around your middle increases the chance of a heart attack. Lifestyle changes and regular exercise will help you maintain a healthy weight, avoid or reduce belly fat, and lower your risk for heart disease.

Health benefits of coffee and a proposed warning label

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

A chemical produced during the process of roasting coffee is considered potentially harmful, but the amounts are small, and the potential health benefits of drinking coffee are likely to outweigh any potential risk.

Common food additives and chemicals harmful to children

Claire McCarthy, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Food additives and chemicals are common in all kinds of products, including packaging and personal care items, and pose greater risk to children than to adults. Simple steps to minimize exposure are sensible and do not require radical lifestyle changes.

Do I have anxiety or worry: What’s the difference?

Everyone experiences anxiety (and a certain amount can be beneficial), but some people’s anxiety levels are high enough to be considered a clinical disorder. If your feelings of anxiety are somewhere in the middle, there are strategies you can use to bring them down to a less distressing level.

10 tricks to reduce salt (sodium) in your diet

Most people regularly exceed the recommended daily amount of sodium, but making some simple food substitutions in your regular eating habits can help you trim your salt intake.

How long will my hip or knee replacement last?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD

Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Anyone who needs a knee or hip replacement wants to know if it will be permanent, or if the replacement will need to be replaced at some point. While this is impossible to predict, and many factors affect longevity of replacement joints, data from past surgeries can help give some idea of what a person can expect.