Archive for December, 2017

Avoiding holiday excess (and what to do if you overdo it)

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
Monique Tello, MD, MPH, Contributing Editor

During the holiday season it’s easy to indulge in too much rich food or alcohol (or both), but some strategic planning ahead of your temptation-filled events can keep you feeling good. And if you’ve already had too much, there are things you can do to feel better quickly.

Is there a link between alcohol and skin cancer?

Emily S. Ruiz, MD, MPH
Emily S. Ruiz, MD, MPH, Contributor

An analysis of studies found an association between alcohol consumption and increased risk of certain skin cancers, but there is no solid evidence of a direct connection.

What to do for stubborn low back pain

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
Monique Tello, MD, MPH, Contributing Editor

How does a doctor treat her own back pain? By following the same advice she gives her patients: alternating ice and heat, doing core exercises, applying topical remedies, and taking over-the-counter medication only if other therapies are not effective.

Can shoveling snow put your heart at risk?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD
Robert H. Shmerling, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Based on data from over three decades of Canadian hospital admissions, there is evidence to suggest that men who are at high risk of heart disease, or who already have it, should avoid shoveling snow.

More than half of today’s children will be obese adults

Claire McCarthy, MD
Claire McCarthy, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

As new research shows that children who are obese are likely to remain so throughout their lives, emphasizing healthy eating and regular physical activity becomes even more important.

Can an online game really improve blood sugar control for people with diabetes?

Robert H. Shmerling, MD
Robert H. Shmerling, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

Participation in an online game could lead to better control of blood sugar in people with poorly controlled diabetes, according to newly published research.

The Couric-Jolie effect: When celebrities share their medical experiences

Robert H. Shmerling, MD
Robert H. Shmerling, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing

When a prominent person uses their notoriety to raise awareness of a health condition, it can encourage others to seek testing or treatment, but it’s important to be sure that any medical test or procedure is necessary for a particular person.