Archive for 2017

Study investigates treatment regret among prostate cancer survivors

Charlie Schmidt
Charlie Schmidt, Editor, Harvard Medical School Annual Report on Prostate Disease

Surveys of over 900 men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer in the 1990s found that approximately 15% had some regret over their treatment choices. Study authors encourage doctors and patients to have frank and thorough discussions about about the risks and benefits of various forms of treatment for prostate cancer.

Yoga could slow the harmful effects of stress and inflammation

Marlynn Wei, MD, JD
Marlynn Wei, MD, JD, Contributing Editor

Because stress and inflammation are so harmful, researchers have been studying how yoga might help ease them. If you’re looking to de-stress, this breathing exercise is simple and can be done anywhere.

Urinary incontinence: Common and manageable

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
Monique Tello, MD, MPH, Contributing Editor

Nearly half of all women will experience some form of urinary incontinence during their lives. In addition to the discomfort, it can affect a person’s emotional health as well. But the condition can be managed for many women with lifestyle changes behavior therapy, or physical therapy.

The best thing you can do to keep your child safe from bullying

Claire McCarthy, MD
Claire McCarthy, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publications

Spending time every day asking children questions in an open-ended way that encourages them to talk fosters an openness that can help parents know what’s going on in a child’s life outside the home, including any potential bullying issues.

Genetic testing to predict medication side effects

Robert H. Shmerling, MD
Robert H. Shmerling, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publications

Genetic testing may help identify when certain people may be at risk of having an adverse reaction to medication. Researchers hope that such testing will eventually be lead to the ability to recommend the most effective medication that has the fewest side effects for a specific person’s condition.

Write your anxieties away

Srini Pillay, MD
Srini Pillay, MD, Contributor

Research into people who struggle with anxiety suggests that free-form writing specifically about their concerns may help the brain use its resources to better focus on challenging tasks.

Exercise: Can a few minutes a day keep a hip fracture away?

Nandini Mani, MD
Nandini Mani, MD, Contributing Editor

As we age we lose bone strength, and the risk of a fracture becomes a serious concern. A study found that exercising for just a few minutes a day brought a reduction In risk for brittle bones.

Good news about the HPV vaccine

Robert H. Shmerling, MD
Robert H. Shmerling, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publications

The administration of the HPV vaccine has significantly lowered rates of infection among the population it is intended to protect, as well as among those who have not been vaccinated.

Talking to children about tragedies in the news

Claire McCarthy, MD
Claire McCarthy, MD, Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publications

A parent’s natural instinct is to protect children from hearing about tragic events like hurricanes or mass shootings, but children may hear about such events on their own, and parents should be prepared to talk with children about them.

Women and pain: Disparities in experience and treatment

Laura Kiesel
Laura Kiesel, Contributor

Most people dealing with chronic pain are women, but most pain research has been done on men. The disparity in how women are diagnosed and treated is unfair, and can be dangerous.