Breast Cancer

What Is It?

Breast cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells that can develop in one of several areas of the breast, including the

  • ducts that carry milk to the nipple

  • small sacs that produce milk (lobules)

  • non-glandular tissue.

Breast cancer is considered invasive when the cancer cells have penetrated the lining of the ducts or lobules. That means the cancer cells can be found in the surrounding tissues, such as fatty and connective tissues or the skin. Noninvasive breast cancer (in situ) occurs when cancer cells fill the ducts but haven't spread into surrounding tissue.

These are the main forms of invasive breast cancer:

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