Styes And Chalazions

What Is It?

A sty, also called hordeolum, is a small abscess of the oil gland associated with an eyelash hair follicle. It typically contains Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, the cause of staph infections. When a sty develops, a small area of the upper or lower eyelid or the corner of the eye becomes red, tender and swollen. Swelling subsides gradually over a period of days after the sty develops an opening, and the pus is able to drain out.

A chalazion, like a sty, is a swelling within the eyelid caused by inflammation of an oil gland. A chalazion differs from a sty in that it does not contain an active bacterial infection. A chalazion is sometimes the aftereffect of a sty. It is less tender but lasts longer.

Natural oils from the eyelid's oil glands must drain through ducts out to the eyelashes. If debris blocks this normal drainage, it may cause a sty or chalazion. Sometimes, this debris accumulates because of a condition called blepharitis, a long-standing inflammation of the edges of the eyelids, with redness, thickening and scales and crusts.

To continue reading this article, you must login.
  • Research health conditions
  • Check your symptoms
  • Prepare for a doctor's visit or test
  • Find the best treatments and procedures for you
  • Explore options for better nutrition and exercise
Learn more about the many benefits and features of joining Harvard Health Online »