Women's Health

Women have many unique health concerns — menstrual cycles, pregnancy, birth control, menopause — and that's just the beginning. A number of health issues affect only women and others are more common in women. What's more, men and women may have the same condition, but different symptoms. Many diseases affect women differently and may even require distinct treatment.

We tend to think of breast cancer and osteoporosis as women's health diseases, but they also occur in men. Heart disease in a serious concern to both men and women, but risk factors and approaches to prevention are different. Women may also have specific concerns about aging, caregiving, emotional health issues, and skin care.

Women's Health Articles

Abortion (Termination Of Pregnancy)

Abortion is the removal of pregnancy tissue, products of conception or the fetus and placenta (afterbirth) from the uterus. The terms fetus and placenta usually are used after eight weeks of pregnancy, while the other terms describe tissue produced by the union of an egg and sperm before eight weeks. Each year approximately 1.2 million women in the United States choose to end a pregnancy. Other terms for an abortion include elective abortion, induced abortion, termination of pregnancy and therapeutic abortion. (Locked) More »

Cystourethrogram

By filling your bladder with a liquid dye that shows up on x-rays, your doctor can watch the motion of your bladder as it fills and empties and can see if your urine splashes backwards toward your kidneys as the bladder muscle squeezes. This kind of test can help your doctor to better understand problems with repeated urinary tract infections or problems involving damage to the kidneys. It can also be useful for evaluating urine leakage problems. (Locked) More »

Cervicitis

The cervix is the donut-shaped opening to the uterus. Cervicitis is an inflammation and irritation of the cervix. Symptoms of cervicitis can be similar to vaginitis, with vaginal discharge, itching or pain with intercourse. Cervicitis can be caused by a sexually transmitted infection. Most common are chlamydia and gonorrhea. Trichomoniasis and genital herpes can also cause cervicitis. In some cases, cervicitis is not caused by infection. It may be due to trauma, frequent douching or exposure to chemical irritants. (Locked) More »

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

Pelvic inflammatory disease is an infection of the uterus, fallopian tubes or ovaries. It is the most common serious infection among young women, with approximately 1 million new cases diagnosed in the United States each year. It usually affects sexually active women during their childbearing years. About one in every seven women receives treatment for pelvic inflammatory disease at some point in her life. (Locked) More »

Miscarriage

A miscarriage is a loss of a pregnancy. The term is generally used when the loss occurs before the fetus might be able to survive outside the womb, so before about 22 to 24 weeks of gestation. Other terms that are used for such losses include spontaneous abortion and early pregnancy failure. (Locked) More »

Preeclampsia And Eclampsia

Preeclampsia is a condition that occurs only during pregnancy, and usually only after the 20th week. A woman with preeclampsia develops high blood pressure and protein in her urine, and she often has swelling (edema) of the legs, hands, face, or entire body. When preeclampsia becomes severe, it can cause dangerous complications for the mother and the fetus. One of these complications is eclampsia, the name for seizures that are associated with severe preeclampsia. (Locked) More »

Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a collection of symptoms that many women experience during the one to two weeks before a menstrual period. These symptoms may be physical, psychological and emotional. They disappear soon after the start of menstrual bleeding. (Locked) More »

Vaginitis

Vaginitis is inflammation of the vagina. In premenopausal women, infection is the most common cause. After menopause, a low level of estrogen often leads to vaginal atrophy (atrophic vaginitis). Vaginitis also can be the result of an allergic reaction to an irritating chemical, such as a spermicide, douche or bath soap. (Locked) More »

Endometriosis

Endometrial tissue lines the inside of the uterus. In endometriosis, the same type of tissue also grows in places outside of the uterus. Implants or patches of endometriosis may develop in the: Ovaries Outside surface of the uterus Pelvis and lower abdomen Fallopian tubes Spaces between the bladder, uterus and rectum Wall of the rectum, bladder, intestines or appendix (less commonly) Lung, arm, thigh and skin. (This is rare.) Misplaced endometrial tissue behaves like endometrial tissue in the uterus. It responds to the monthly rise and fall of female hormones. It also can ooze blood during menstruation. This can cause pelvic or abdominal pain. (Locked) More »

Fallopian Tube Cancer

The fallopian tubes connect the ovaries and the uterus. Fallopian tube cancer occurs when cells in a tube multiply out of control and form a tumor. As the tumor grows, it presses on the tube, stretching it and causing pain. Over time, the cancer can spread throughout the pelvis and abdomen. This cancer is very rare. It is more common for cancer to spread to a fallopian tube (usually from an ovary, breast or lining of the uterus) than for a new cancer to develop in it. Scientists don't know whether environmental or lifestyle factors increase the risk of this cancer. Some researchers think certain women might inherit a tendency to develop the illness. There is good evidence that women who inherit a mutation in their BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have a greater risk of developing fallopian tube cancer. Mutations (changes) in this gene have also been linked to breast and ovarian cancer. If you are diagnosed with this cancer, consider being tested for these mutations.   (Locked) More »