Women's Health

Women have many unique health concerns — menstrual cycles, pregnancy, birth control, menopause — and that's just the beginning. A number of health issues affect only women and others are more common in women. What's more, men and women may have the same condition, but different symptoms. Many diseases affect women differently and may even require distinct treatment.

We tend to think of breast cancer and osteoporosis as women's health diseases, but they also occur in men. Heart disease in a serious concern to both men and women, but risk factors and approaches to prevention are different. Women may also have specific concerns about aging, caregiving, emotional health issues, and skin care.

Women's Health Articles

3 easy ways to boost your brain

Studies have indicted that caring for a dog, creating art, and spending time with a grandchild can boost different aspects of memory and reasoning. (Locked) More »

Don’t tolerate food intolerance

Food intolerances occur more often as men age since their digestion naturally slows and the body produces less of the enzymes needed to break down food. Using a food diary can help men identify problem foods and portion sizes that cause digestive problems so they can make the necessary dietary adjustments. (Locked) More »

The family history of cancer

Family history can be one of the first lines of defense in preventing cancer. Knowing the detailed history of cancer on both sides of a man’s family can protect him, and even his children, by preventing cancers before they develop and helping to diagnose cancers early. (Locked) More »

What are the best ways to treat plantar warts?

Salicylic acid, a prescription-strength medicine, and cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen are common treatments for plantar warts. However, if these do not work, consult with a dermatologist or podiatrist about other options like other injected and topical drugs or laser therapy. (Locked) More »

What you may not know about your heart

Although cardiovascular disease is diagnosed later in women than men, it can begin to develop in early adulthood. The disease is more likely to affect the heart’s network of microscopic vessels and to have more subtle symptoms in women. (Locked) More »