Vitamins & Supplements

Vitamins & Supplements Articles

Are you getting enough B12?

Vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to anemia, nerve damage, and cognitive problems. Seniors, vegans, and people with certain health conditions can get additional vitamin B12 through fortified foods, dietary supplements, or injections. (Locked) More »

Calcium and heart disease: What is the connection?

Calcium supplements do not seem to increase the risk of heart disease. But it’s best to get the recommended daily intake of this mineral (which ranges from 1,000 to 1,200 milligrams per day, depending on age and gender) from foods rather than pills. Potential calcium sources include dairy products, canned salmon or sardines with bones, and calcium-fortified orange juice. Figs, broccoli, and kale also provide modest amounts of calcium. (Locked) More »

Can vitamin C prevent a cold?

For the general population, taking daily vitamin C does not reduce the risk of getting a cold. Taking at least 200 milligrams (mg) of vitamin C per day appears to reduce the duration of cold symptoms by an average of 8% in adults and 14% in children, meaning recovery about one day sooner. It’s best to get vitamin C from food. Eating the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables per day should provide the Recommended Dietary Allowance of 90 mg per day for men and 75 mg per day for women. More »

Do omega-3s protect your thinking skills?

For people who are healthy and who don’t have a decline in memory and thinking skills, it appears that dietary omega-3 fats may help preserve thinking skills. It is unclear if omega-3 fats from fish oil pills offer the same protection. Eating omega-3s in fish may also be linked to a lower risk of developing cardiovascular disease, because omega-3s may help to ease inflammation, maintain a steady heartbeat, and prevent blood clots. Both the federal government and the American Heart Association recommend eating two servings each week of fatty fish such as salmon or mackerel. (Locked) More »

Magnesium: A mineral you might be missing

Most people in the United States don’t get the recommended amount of magnesium in their diets. Nuts, leafy greens, and whole grains are rich in this essential mineral, which seems to help lower blood pressure. Certain people with high blood pressure may benefit from taking magnesium supplements, but there is insufficient evidence to recommend this practice. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, which recommends eight to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables daily, provides plenty of magnesium and is also low in sodium, which can raise blood pressure.  (Locked) More »