Physical Activity

Physical Activity Articles

A workout for your brain

Some hospitals, research centers, and private practices offer brain fitness programs. They typically include a combination of physical exercise, cognitive training, good nutrition, better sleep, and meditation. Look for programs that offer a multidisciplinary approach with a neurologist, psychologist, social worker, physical therapist, and dietitian. Beware of promises of cures, and don’t assume that doing well on a computer game means there is improvement in cognition. Look for programs that measure the biological effect of the training and experts who can explain the results and how they plan to use that information. More »

Dance your way to better heart health?

Regular, moderate-intensity dancing may lower the risk of dying of cardiovascular disease. Aside from the exercise benefits, dancing is often a lifelong habit and provides stress-lowering social connections.  More »

Exercise-free activities that work your muscles and heart

Engaging in recreational or household activities that work the heart and muscles is an effective way to get a workout. Examples include swimming, gardening, dancing, bowling, playing tennis, brisk walking, playing with kids, golfing, vigorous house cleaning, and any other activities that increase heart rate and make the muscles move. It’s important to track the time doing these activities when substituting them for a traditional workout. Activity trackers and journals are handy tools for this.  More »

Make a home gym work for you

Making physical activity a habit takes determination and perseverance no matter what the setting. People who find time and convenience the main obstacles to getting to the gym may benefit from creating a simple workout area at home. Inexpensive items such as small hand and leg weights, portable pedaling machines, resistance bands, and a foam floor mat are perfect for a beginner’s needs. The dedicated exerciser may decide to invest in a professional-quality treadmill or other aerobic machine, or a home gym weight system. (Locked) More »

Our best balance boosters

Poor balance is a common cause of falls, which send millions of people in the United States to emergency departments each year with broken hips and head injuries. Many strategies can improve balance, such as physical therapy, muscle strengthening, and tai chi or yoga. Vision is key to balance, so it’s important to get a comprehensive eye exam. A cane or a walker can complement balance and give a person more stability. It’s best to get measured for such a device and then get physical therapy to learn how to use it. More »

Step lively with walking

Walking tends to be unappreciated as adequate exercise. But approached the right way, at a certain speed and pace, it can be a primary form of fitness and possibly reduce risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. (Locked) More »