Pain

Everyone experiences pain at some time. It might be the result of an injury, operation, or pushing your body too hard. Headache, infection, arthritis, and other health problems cause pain. Unchecked, pain can rob you of the ability to sleep, work, and enjoy life. It can also lead to depression and anxiety.

We've come a long way from the days of "grin and bear it," or "no pain, no gain." Pain begets pain, so it's important to stop it early. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to pain relief. Standard medications can be a good option for many pain sufferers, but a wide range of effective nondrug therapies are also available.

Pain Articles

Could that joint pain be rheumatoid arthritis?

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a progressive disease that can affect the whole body, including the heart, lungs, and eyes. It may cause damage to the joints, tendons, and bones. Classic symptoms include persistent swelling in multiple joints, pain that is worse in the morning and better with movement, and persistent fatigue. It’s important to begin treating RA as soon as possible, because medication may help slow the disease process. Other therapies include exercise, splinting, weight loss, and smoking cessation. (Locked) More »

The downside of taking pills to treat chronic pain

Not understanding the risks of using painkillers can be dangerous. Large doses of acetaminophen can damage the liver. Regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been linked to ulcers, stomach bleeding, kidney problems, high blood pressure, and increased risk of heart attack or stroke. Long-term use of prescription painkillers called opioids comes with the risk of dependence, addiction, overdose, death, constipation, falls, slowed reaction time, and slowed breathing. It’s important to weigh the risks and benefits of long-term use of painkillers by talking with a doctor. (Locked) More »

Avoid workout injuries

You might be focused on outcomes when you exercise: stronger muscles, weight loss, or other aspects of better health and wellness. But if you don't focus on the exercise, and what it takes to do it safely, you may set yourself up for workout injuries. Safe exercise requires planning and careful execution. Start by finding the best exercise for your ability. For example, if you have joint pain, you can avoid workout injuries by choosing exercise that relieves joint pressure, such as swimming or cycling. If you have balance problems, a supervised exercise program with a personal trainer might be a safer bet. Discuss the options with your doctor, a personal trainer, or a friend; and get the okay from your doctor before starting a program, especially if you have heart or lung disease. Getting the right equipment also helps ensure safe exercise. If using hand weights, start with a level that matches your current ability. And choose clothes and shoes designed for your type of exercise. For example, wear reflective clothing if you're going to walk, run, or cycle outside, so you'll be visible to drivers. More »

Home remedies for low back pain

As people enter middle age, they are more likely to experience bouts of low back pain. In fact, according to the Harvard Special Health Report Men's Health: Fifty and Forward, back pain affects about four in five Americans at some point in their lives and equally strikes men and women. Age is often the culprit. Over time, the bones and joints in your lower back begin to change. Your discs (the structures that serve as cushions between the bones in the spine) tend to wear out and sometimes become fragmented. These structural alterations sometimes cause pain. More »

The healing power of touch

Men may think of massage as a once-in-a-while treat, but this type of therapy could be a natural way to treat chronic pain, such as low back pain, headache, cancer pain, and arthritis pain, by helping to reduce muscle soreness and inflammation. Massage therapy also can help with recovery from injury or surgery as well as easing stress and anxiety.  (Locked) More »

What makes my joints stiff in the morning?

Morning stiffness like in the back, knees, and feet are common complaints for many older adults. People cannot reverse the affects of joint aging, but they can reduce the severity and frequency of morning stiffness by being more active and adopting regular exercise to increase muscular strength and flexibility.  More »