Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

Do omega-3s protect your thinking skills?

For people who are healthy and who don’t have a decline in memory and thinking skills, it appears that dietary omega-3 fats may help preserve thinking skills. It is unclear if omega-3 fats from fish oil pills offer the same protection. Eating omega-3s in fish may also be linked to a lower risk of developing cardiovascular disease, because omega-3s may help to ease inflammation, maintain a steady heartbeat, and prevent blood clots. Both the federal government and the American Heart Association recommend eating two servings each week of fatty fish such as salmon or mackerel. (Locked) More »

Higher levels of omega-6 fatty acids may lower death rates in older men

A new study found that high levels of omega-6 fatty acids in the subcutaneous adipose tissue—the layer of fat just beneath the skin—correlated with lower death rates among older men. Omega-6s mostly come in the form of linoleic acid, found in plant oils (such as corn, soybean, and sunflower oils) as well as nuts and seeds. Linoleic acid is known to shrink levels of bad LDL cholesterol in the blood, which can contribute to lower incidence of heart disease. More »

Magnesium: A mineral you might be missing

Most people in the United States don’t get the recommended amount of magnesium in their diets. Nuts, leafy greens, and whole grains are rich in this essential mineral, which seems to help lower blood pressure. Certain people with high blood pressure may benefit from taking magnesium supplements, but there is insufficient evidence to recommend this practice. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, which recommends eight to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables daily, provides plenty of magnesium and is also low in sodium, which can raise blood pressure.  (Locked) More »

The boozy business meal: Costly for your heart?

People who follow a “social-business” eating pattern (marked by frequent snacking and restaurant meals featuring meat, sugary drinks, and alcohol) may be more likely to develop early signs of heart disease than people with healthier diets.  More »

The lowdown on low sodium

The FDA advises people to consume no more than 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium daily—about the amount in 1 teaspoon of salt. But the average person consumes about 50% more—3,500 mg per day—with higher intake among men. About 75% of dietary sodium comes from processed and restaurant foods, but men also need to be mindful about everyday items like bread, cold cuts, soup, and poultry, which are often high in sodium even though they may not taste salty. (Locked) More »

An easy way to soup up your diet

Soup may have hidden health risks. Many store-bought and some restaurant soups contain unnatural ingredients, such as preservatives, or unhealthy ingredients such as saturated fat, sodium, or sugar. It’s best to avoid prepared soups, although they’re okay on occasion, within limits. Aim for less than 500 calories, 600 mg of sodium, 5 grams of saturated fat, and 5 grams of added sugar in a bowl of soup. The healthiest soups are made from scratch, without fatty cream-based broths. (Locked) More »