Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

How to stick to a low-salt diet when dining out

Most restaurant offerings are very high in sodium, a known contributor to high blood pressure. But people can limit their sodium when eating out by checking online nutrition information, which is required by law in restaurants with more than 20 locations. Other tips include avoiding foods that are smoked or cured, as well as processed or instant food commonly found in fast-food restaurants. Another strategy is to frequent farm-to-table establishments that serve fresh, locally produced foods, and asking the chef to grill, broil, or steam the food with no added sauces or seasonings. (Locked) More »

Why nutritionists are crazy about nuts

Eating fewer than five 1.5-ounce servings per week of nuts and seeds has been linked to an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease and diabetes. To reduce health risks, snack on nuts and seeds, substitute them for meat, or add them to cereals, salads, and main dishes. (Locked) More »

Breakfast and beyond: The case for a healthy morning meal

Skipping breakfast puts a strain on your body, which may increase the risk of insulin resistance, high blood pressure, and cholesterol problems. Breakfast may also help people maintain a healthy body weight. A healthy breakfast should include lean protein, whole-grain carbohydrates, healthy fat, and fresh fruit. (Locked) More »

Is your salad dressing hurting your healthy diet?

Store-bought salad dressings often have extra calories, sodium, added sugar, saturated fat, and preservatives. One should look for dressing that has no more than 120 calories, 200 milligrams (mg) of sodium, 2 grams of sugar, and 1 gram of saturated fat per serving. If a favorite dressing exceeds those limits, dietitians recommend using only half a serving and mixing it with vinegar. It’s best to make a salad dressing at home with healthy ingredients such as olive oil, vinegar, garlic, mustard, spices, and citrus juice. (Locked) More »

The sweet danger of sugar

Americans consume way too much added sugar—estimates suggest an average of 24 teaspoons per day—which can have a serious impact on heart health. Consuming natural sugar is better, as plant foods also have high amounts of fiber, essential minerals, and antioxidants. But even so called healthy carbs can have added sugar—extra amounts that food manufacturers add to products to increase flavor and extend shelf life. (Locked) More »

Cracking the coconut craze

Coconut oil has been touted as a healthy food choice, specifically for the heart. But because of its high saturated fat content, coconut oil tends to raise cholesterol levels, perhaps making it a less than ideal choice for people who want to avoid heart disease. Coconut oil tends to raise beneficial HDL cholesterol more than other fats do, possibly because it is rich in lauric acid, a fatty acid that’s processed slightly differently by the body than other saturated fats. Also, some evidence suggests that coconut oil may not raise total cholesterol as much as butter does. But there is no good evidence that consuming coconut oil can lower heart disease risk. (Locked) More »

More green, less red

A semi-vegetarian diet can help men adopt a more plant-based diet in which they cut out the red and processed meat and eat healthier animal products like seafood and poultry only occasionally. This can increase their intake of antioxidants, essential vitamins and minerals, and fiber while cutting back on the quantity and frequency of meat, which can contain high amounts of saturated fats, sodium, and chemical additives. (Locked) More »

Power up your diet with plant-based meals

Two trends in restaurants can be applied at home for healthy eating. One is the veg-centric approach, which focuses on roasting, layering, caramelizing, and grilling vegetables to give them bold flavors and appeal. One can give this a try by pairing creative combinations of vegetables, spices, and even fruit. The other trend features meatless meals with plant-based proteins, such as legumes (beans, lentils, and peas), nuts and nut butters, seeds, whole grains, and tofu and tempeh (which both come from soybeans). Dietitians suggest eating more plant-based proteins gradually, starting with once a week. (Locked) More »