Mind & Mood

Your mood and your mental health affect every aspect of your life, from how you feel about yourself to your relationships with others and your physical health. There's a strong link between good mental health and good physical health, and vice versa. In the other direction, depression and other mental health issues can contribute to digestive disorders, trouble sleeping, lack of energy, heart disease, and other health issues.

There are many ways to keep your mind and mood in optimal shape. Exercise, healthy eating, and stress reduction techniques like meditation or mindfulness can keep your brain — and your body — in tip-top shape.

When mood and mental health slip, doing something about it as early as possible can keep the change from getting worse or becoming permanent. Treating conditions like depression and anxiety improve quality of life. Learning to manage stress makes for more satisfying and productive days.

Mind & Mood Articles

Six common depression types

Depression is not only hard to endure, it is also a risk factor for heart disease and dementia. "Depressive symptoms can occur in adults for many reasons. If you are experiencing mood or cognitive changes that last for more than a few weeks, it's a good idea to bring this up with your doctor or consult a mental health specialist to help sort out possible causes," says Dr. Nancy Donovan, an instructor in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. The four most common types of depression are major depression, persistent depressive disorder(formerly known as dysthymia), bipolar disorder, and seasonal affective disorder. Major depression. The classic depression type, major depression is a state where a dark mood is all-consuming and one loses interest in activities, even ones that are usually pleasurable.  Symptoms of this type of depression include trouble sleeping, changes in appetite or weight, loss of energy, and feeling worthless. Thoughts of death or suicide may occur. It is usually treated with psychotherapy and medication. For some people with severe depression that isn't alleviated with psychotherapy or antidepressant medications, electroconvulsive therapy may be effective. More »

How to make boredom work for you

Boredom is an unpleasant sensation that is usually masked by entertainment or activity. Dealing with boredom by creating mental diversions can stimulate creativity. Exploring one’s boredom can and lead to greater self-awareness. More »

Overcoming anxiety

Millions of older adults suffer from anxiety. Idleness in retirement, financial worries, and health issues are the leading causes of anxiety among older men. However, the condition is highly treatable with therapy, medication, and simple lifestyle changes. More »

Working out while angry? Just don’t do it

Anger or emotional upset may double the risk of having a heart attack. Heavy physical exertion appears to have the same effect. And people who do intense exercise while they’re upset or mad may face three times the risk of heart attack.  More »

Yes, you can stick to an exercise regimen!

Staying on an exercise regimen can be challenging, but some strategies may help people to stick to the program. Strategies include doing an enjoyable activity, setting goals and rewards, scheduling exercise in a written plan, gradually increasing intensity, exercising with a buddy, charting progress in a journal or with an activity tracker, making exercise more challenging by changing the frequency or duration, and getting back to a normal exercise routine if it falls by the wayside. (Locked) More »

Getting through grief

Although most people recover from the loss of a loved one, grieving can lead to depression. It’s important for the bereaved to focus on maintaining good health habits, recognize their needs and limitations, and get adequate emotional support. (Locked) More »

Is your antidepressant making life a little too blah?

Sometimes, the effect of antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) goes beyond improving mood and makes a person feel too little emotion. For example, a person may not cry at a movie’s ending, laugh with the same gusto, or get the same kick out of doing things that once brought enjoyment. A change of drug or dose may fix this. However, it’s important not to stop taking an SSRI without a doctor’s supervision. Suddenly stopping the medication may cause a relapse into depression.  (Locked) More »