Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

3 easy ways to boost your brain

Studies have indicted that caring for a dog, creating art, and spending time with a grandchild can boost different aspects of memory and reasoning. (Locked) More »

Another way to think about dementia

Vascular dementia is the second most common type of dementia. It often gets confused with normal aging since symptoms can mirror everyday “senior moments,” like forgetting a name or just-learned information. Several factors put people at a greater risk for vascular dementia, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, heart disease, being overweight, and smoking. Making lifestyle changes offers the best protection against the condition.  More »

Boning up on osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is often considered a woman’s disease, but older men also need to be concerned about this bone-thinning condition. Osteoporosis can be detected early with a bone mineral density test, but there are steps men can take to help prevent and treat it. These include a combination of lifestyle changes, supplements, and medication, if necessary.  (Locked) More »

Don’t tolerate food intolerance

Food intolerances occur more often as men age since their digestion naturally slows and the body produces less of the enzymes needed to break down food. Using a food diary can help men identify problem foods and portion sizes that cause digestive problems so they can make the necessary dietary adjustments. (Locked) More »

Fitness trackers: A path to a healthier heart?

New, scientifically validated digital fitness trackers may help people know if they’re exercising enough to lower their risk of heart disease. They rely on an algorithm known as Personalized Activity Intelligence that converts a person’s heart rate to a number of points, based on age, gender, and resting and maximum heart rate. For people who are sedentary or have chronic health conditions, the free iPrescribe Exercise app offers evidence-based advice that can help them exercise safely.  (Locked) More »

New approach identifies returning prostate cancer

Researchers have mapped patterns of prostate cancer recurrence following surgery, which may help doctors find the best way to treat men whose cancer has returned. About 30% of men who have prostate cancer surgery will have a recurrence, according to the study in the Journal of Urology.  More »

The family history of cancer

Family history can be one of the first lines of defense in preventing cancer. Knowing the detailed history of cancer on both sides of a man’s family can protect him, and even his children, by preventing cancers before they develop and helping to diagnose cancers early. (Locked) More »

What are the best ways to treat plantar warts?

Salicylic acid, a prescription-strength medicine, and cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen are common treatments for plantar warts. However, if these do not work, consult with a dermatologist or podiatrist about other options like other injected and topical drugs or laser therapy. (Locked) More »

Looking for a few good men

Many research studies are looking for qualified men to participate. Not only can men help with the greater good of advancing medical research, participating in a study gives them an opportunity to prevent or treat common diseases and conditions with the latest medications, supplements, or procedures. (Locked) More »