Healthy Aging

Healthy Aging Articles

Can you, should you, have medically tailored food delivered to your home?

Many older adults who have chronic illness or have just come home from the hospital are unable to shop for or cook their own meals. The result is a diet that’s deficient in the nutrients essential for good health, or meals that don’t follow dietary restrictions, such as low salt or low potassium. A solution is having medically tailored meals prepared by friends and family, or prepared and delivered by a nonprofit organization such as Community Servings in Boston. (Locked) More »

Keep on driving

An older man’s health tends to go downhill after he loses the ability to drive. Driving keeps men more independent and increases their ability to socialize, visit the doctor, or go exercise. The best ways to ensure men stay behind the wheel is to sharpen certain physical and cognitive skills, as well as reviewing other aspects that affect driving ability, such as medication side effects and car accessories. (Locked) More »

Should you try a home genetic test kit?

Direct-to-consumer test kits can help detect a person’s genetic predisposition or odds of developing certain medical diseases or conditions. They are simple to use and can be done in the privacy of home. The tests analyze markers in DNA to look for mutations or markers associated with common diseases, such as late-onset Alzheimer’s disease or particular cancers. Results can be used as a way to explore things people should already be doing to improve health and reduce the risk of disease, such as losing weight, exercising, and lowering cholesterol and blood pressure. (Locked) More »

Practical advice for helping people with dementia with their daily routines

Caring for someone with Alzheimer's is one of the toughest jobs 
in the world. "It is stressful, physically and emotionally draining, and very expensive, as almost 15 million unpaid caregivers for people with Alzheimer's and other dementias can attest," says Dr. Scott McGinnis, medical editor of the Harvard Special Health Report A Guide to Coping with Alzheimer's Disease. Learning how to take care of a person with dementia can be a trial-and-error process. Every person with dementia and every caregiver is unique, and so is their relationship. However, the following general tips may be useful in helping people with dementia remain physically healthy and connected to the world. More »

Elevated blood pressure may not predict early death in those with weak grip strength

Elevated blood pressure is not a useful sign of a high risk of early death among older adults if they have weak grip strength, says a new study. The findings suggest that when an older person still functions at a high level physically, high blood pressure can help indicate mortality risk. However, when the person is not physically robust, high blood pressure may not always be a viable marker. More »

Can relationships boost longevity and well-being?

A Harvard study that’s lasted for eight decades suggests that maintaining meaningful relationships plays an important role in health, happiness, and longevity. The Harvard Study of Adult Development has collected health and wellness information from a group of men since they were teenagers in 1938. By following the men, researchers have found that people who are more socially connected to family, friends, and community are happier, healthier, and longer-lived than people who are less well connected. (Locked) More »

Choosing a senior living community

Choosing a senior living community for yourself or a loved one can feel overwhelming. There are many options for long-term care available, and it may be difficult to know what will best suit your needs. Doing some research is a good first step. And you'll need to arm yourself with a list of questions to ask senior living communities. Among the questions to ask senior living communities, one of the first should be about the level of care you or a loved one needs. The options boil down to three levels:  Safety and quality of care are also important to list among questions to asksenior living communities. There are many rules and regulations that retirement facilities must follow. A good way to check on nursing home safety and quality is by visiting www.medicare.gov.  More »

What does it take to be a super-ager?

Super-agers are people in their 70s or 80s who have cognitive or physical function equal to that of people decades younger. Super-agers tend to push beyond their comfort zones to take on greater challenges compared with their average contemporaries. More »