Diseases & Conditions

The human body is a remarkable structure. It's designed to efficiently manage the wear and tear of everyday life and fend off all sorts of threats. Most of us are healthy for most of our lives. But we're also susceptible to hundreds of injuries, diseases, and conditions. Some are quite common, others are extremely rare. Here are some of the most common conditions that affect humans.


Diseases & Conditions Articles

3 things you can do about shingles

Vaccination can prevent or minimize shingles. Immediate treatment with antiviral medications can relieve the symptoms, and tricyclic antidepressants can treat any long-lasting pain or itching. (Locked) More »

Gum disease may signal warning for pancreatic cancer

Research has found that people with high levels of the oral bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis had a 59% greater risk of developing pancreatic cancer. It is too early to say whether this specific bacterium directly contributes to the disease. However, one theory is that since inflammation is related to cancer, the bacteria could cause inflammation in the pancreas. Another possibility is the bacteria are simply a marker for cancer-causing inflammation.  More »

Playing with the fire of inflammation

Inflammation has an important role in how your immune system keeps your body and safe and healthy. Yet chronic inflammation can damage healthy tissues and organs and contribute to heart disease, arthritis, and other health problems. However, diet and lifestyle changes can help reduce chronic inflammation and keep it in check.  More »

Surgery for weight loss: A standard treatment for type 2 diabetes?

Weight-loss surgery not only leads to dramatic weight loss, it also reverses type 2 diabetes in most people who undergo these stomach-shrinking procedures. In fact, international diabetes organizations now say that surgery for weight loss should become a more routine treatment option for people with type 2 diabetes—even those who are only mildly obese. More »

Attack of the gallstones

Gallstones form because there is too much cholesterol in your bile, a fluid made by your liver to digest fat. Gallstone attacks occur when they become too big or too abundant and block the normal flow of bile. If too much bile gets trapped, the gallbladder can become inflamed, and bile also can back up and enter the blood, which can cause jaundice. While there is no surefire way to prevent gallstones, people can reduce their risk by adopting a diet that cuts out high-fat foods in favor of more plant-based foods, exercising more to maintain a healthy weight. More »

Is something in your diet causing diarrhea?

Diarrhea may be caused by a number of factors. When it comes to diet, foods that are sugary, fatty, spicy, or fried can cause loose stools or make them worse. Dairy foods and foods with gluten can also cause diarrhea. Identifying foods and drinks that may be causing loose stools, and then eliminating those foods or drinks from the diet, can help reduce diarrhea. Other causes of diarrhea include bacterial or viral infection; surgery to the digestive system; alcohol abuse; medication side effects; and medical conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome. (Locked) More »

Unveiling post-traumatic stress disorder

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious and potentially debilitating condition that can occur in people who have experienced a natural disaster, war, terrorism, serious accident, sudden death of a loved one, violent personal assault, or other life-threatening events. In fact, research suggests that 70% of men ages 65 and older have been exposed to at least one potentially traumatic event during their lifetime. PTSD is often difficult to diagnose because many of its symptoms overlap with depression. But most people recover when treated early. (Locked) More »

Why you should always have aspirin on hand

An 81-milligram aspirin is recommended daily for people ages 50 through 69 who have an increased risk of heart attack or stroke. It might also reduce colon cancer risk. A 325-milligram aspirin tablet can mitigate the effects of heart attack or stroke. (Locked) More »