Diseases & Conditions

The human body is a remarkable structure. It's designed to efficiently manage the wear and tear of everyday life and fend off all sorts of threats. Most of us are healthy for most of our lives. But we're also susceptible to hundreds of injuries, diseases, and conditions. Some are quite common, others are extremely rare. Here are some of the most common conditions that affect humans.


Diseases & Conditions Articles

Surviving the flu season

Even if the flu shot isn’t a perfect match for the virus, vaccination still lowers the chance of getting influenza and reduces symptoms for those who do. Fluzone High Dose and Fluad are more effective for people 65 and older. (Locked) More »

A new look at colon cancer screening

Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths and the third most common cancer in men. Screening tests to help find and often remove polyps before they become cancer are recommended for men ages 50 to 75, yet many avoid them. To help highlight the urgency for regular colon cancer screenings, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has issued updated recommendations and described tests that might be a better option than an invasive colonoscopy, especially for lower-risk men. More »

Heart disease and brain health: Looking at the links

Cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol can cause poor blood flow and vascular damage in the brain. Over time, these changes cause a decline in cognitive abilities and pave the way for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Taking steps to manage blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol may help support brain function. (Locked) More »

Monitoring your heart rhythm with a smartphone: A good call?

Smartphone apps that detect possible atrial fibrillation (afib) may one day help improve screening for this common heart rhythm disorder. One app currently under development relies on the phone’s camera and flash to measure color changes in a person’s finger to detect a pulse and any irregularities. Another, which is placed on a user’s chest, relies on the phone’s internal sensors that track speed, movement, and orientation.  (Locked) More »

Should I worry about a heart murmur?

Heart murmurs can occur when people are young and then return in older age. There are three main causes in adults: increased volume or speed of blood flowing through a normal heart, a stiff heart valve, or a leaky heart valve. Most do not lead to heart problems, but a change in the murmur’s intensity or the appearance of symptoms like shortness of breath, light-headedness, or chest pain would prompt a further medical evaluation. (Locked) More »

Treatment options for obstructive sleep apnea

There are many treatments for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The gold standard in treatment is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), but some people have trouble adjusting to a bulky CPAP mask. Other options to treat OSA include weight loss, sleeping against a wedge pillow, disposable nasal valves, an oral appliance, and surgery. The latest treatment is an implanted pacemaker that stimulates the tongue to tighten when a person breathes, keeping the tongue from blocking the airway. (Locked) More »

What can be done about droopy eyelids?

Droopy eyelids, known as ptosis, are often a normal occurrence of aging although some neurologic conditions also can cause the condition. Ptosis is not a serious problem unless it interferes with your vision. If this happens, or if your droopy eyelids are bothersome, you can opt for cosmetic surgery to repair your eyelids. More »