Diet & Weight Loss

A healthy weight is an important element of good health. How much you eat—and what you eat—play central roles in maintaining a healthy weight or losing weight. Exercise is the other key actor.

For years, low-fat diets were thought to be the best way to lose weight. A growing body of evidence shows that low-fat diets often don't work, in part because these diets often replace fat with easily digested carbohydrates.

Hundreds of diets have been created, many promising fast and permanent weight loss. Remember the cabbage soup diet? The grapefruit diet? How about the Hollywood 48 Hour Miracle diet, the caveman diet, the Subway diet, the apple cider vinegar diet, and a host of forgettable celebrity diets?

The truth is, almost any diet will work if it helps you take in fewer calories. Diets do this in two main ways:

  • getting you to eat certain "good" foods and/or avoid "bad" ones
  • changing how you behave and the ways you think or feel about food

The best diet for losing weight is one that is good for all parts of your body, from your brain to your toes, and not just for your waistline. It is also one you can live with for a long time. In other words, a diet that offers plenty of good tasting and healthy choices, banishes few foods, and doesn't require an extensive and expensive list of groceries or supplements.

One diet that fills the bill is a Mediterranean-type diet. Such a diet—and there are many variations—usually includes:

  • several servings of fruits and vegetables a day
  • whole-grain breads and cereals
  • healthy fats from nuts, seeds, and olive oil
  • lean protein from poultry, fish, and beans
  • limited amounts of red meat
  • moderate wine consumption with meals (no more than two glasses a day for men; no more than one a day for women

A Mediterranean-style diet is a flexible eating pattern. People who follow such diets tend to have lower rates of heart disease, diabetes, dementia, and other chronic conditions.

Diet & Weight Loss Articles

Carbohydrates — Good or Bad for You?

Over the years, carbohydrates have gotten a bad reputation. Diets such as Atkins and South Beach promote easy, rapid weight loss that can be very attractive to someone trying to lose weight. By restricting the amounts of carbohydrate that you eat, these diets claim that you can turn your body into a fat-burning machine. When you limit carbohydrates, however, you deprive your body of a main source of fuel — and many essential nutrients that you need to stay healthy. Carbohydrates are foods that get converted into glucose, or sugar, in our bodies during digestion. Glucose is a main source of fuel for our body. It is especially important for the brain, which cannot easily use other fuel sources (such as fat or protein) for energy. (Locked) More »

Do Sugar Substitutes Help You Lose Weight?

With all the health messages on the Internet and in magazines, it's hard to know the truth about sugar substitutes, particularly artificial sweeteners. Maybe you've read that diet soda is bad for you, or that it's perfectly safe. Maybe you've heard horror stories about saccharin, or using stevia for weight loss. If you drink beverages or eat foods that have been sweetened with low- or zero-calorie sugar substitutes instead of sugar, you would expect to save calories — and lose weight. The research supports this assumption, but maybe not to the extent you would expect. Here's what you need to know. Sugar substitutes are found in a variety of products, including: (Locked) More »

Does Metabolism Matter in Weight Loss?

Do you know people who complain about having a slow metabolism and how they barely eat anything yet still gain weight? Or have you met people who complain about someone they know who can eat whatever he or she wants — including large portions of junk food — due to a fast metabolism and apparently never gain weight. In both cases the individual usually ends by saying, "It's not fair!" These scenarios raise several very good questions: The answer to these questions involves a mix of nature (genetic make-up) and nurture (the environment). Metabolism or metabolic rate is defined as the series of chemical reactions in a living organism that create and break down energy necessary for life. More simply, it's the rate at which your body expends energy or burns calories. (Locked) More »

Eating Frequency and Weight Loss

Many Americans struggle with losing weight. They feel frustrated by repeated attempts at weight loss. Fad diets claim successful weight loss, but none of them are proven to work. It's clear that eating fewer calories is important to lose weight. But there is conflicting evidence on the specifics. One area of debate is when to consume calories throughout the day. Is eating three times a day best to achieve weight loss? Or is it better to eat more — or less — frequently? These are tough questions. Some diets suggest eating every two to three hours. Others suggest limiting it to three times per day or even only twice a day. (Locked) More »

End Your Weight Loss Struggles

We usually have the best of intentions when it comes to losing weight. But many of us find our efforts sabotaged by people, places or things. Do any of these scenarios sound familiar? Plan: Eat a nutritious breakfast at homeReality: Got up late, rushed out the door, stopped at the gourmet coffee shop for a latte and a bagel with cream cheese Plan: Refuse second helpings or dessert at the holiday dinner Reality: Aunt Bessie baked your favorite pie; it would feel rude not to have some (Locked) More »

The "Paleo Diet" -- Back to the Stone Age?

We usually look to the latest nutrition research to uncover "super foods" that help promote weight loss and prevent disease. But should we be looking to the past instead of the present or even the future for these foods? According to Loren Cordain, Ph.D., the healthiest diet is one that our ancestors ate 10,000 years ago – during the Paleolithic era. Cordain is the founder of the "Paleo" movement. His diet, the Paleolithic Diet, restricts what you eat to foods the hunter-gathers of the Stone Age ate.  Here's an example of what you can and can't eat:  (Locked) More »

Know your triglycerides: Here's why

Triglycerides are fatty substances (lipids) in the blood that, like “bad” LDL cholesterol, may contribute to risk of heart attacks and strokes. Unless triglycerides are very high, they do not require medication to lower them. Men with mildly to moderately high triglycerides are advised to exercise, lose weight if they are overweight, improve their diet, and reduce alcohol consumption to lower their risk and bring triglycerides to the normal range. Men at above-average cardiovascular risk with high triglycerides can benefit from taking a cholesterol-lowering statin drug. (Locked) More »

What's the best way to lose weight?

Studies show that some commercial weight-loss plans can help people achieve modest weight loss, but there is little evidence of their long-term effectiveness. Calorie control, daily exercise, support, and counseling help with weight loss and maintenance. (Locked) More »

Gain more weight, get more GERD

A study in Norway found that weight gain was directly tied to experiencing new chronic heartburn symptoms. Losing weight is the long-term solution to heartburn, though acid-reducing medication soothes symptoms in the short run. More »