Children's Health

Children's Health Articles

Preventing driving accidents involving teenagers

Teen drivers need experience behind the wheel to develop their skills, so instead of limiting driving time, parents should set limits on a teen's driving behavior, such as having a nighttime curfew and limiting the number of passengers. More »

Treating preschoolers with psychiatric disorders

Because of the rapid pace of brain development in preschoolers, particular care must be used when prescribing them medications for psychiatric conditions or disorders. Psychotherapy should be attempted before prescribing any medication. More »

Emergencies and First Aid - Bleeding

While a minor cut will eventually stop bleeding, a severe injury may require elevation and direct pressure on the wound. The goals of first-aid treatment are to control bleeding and prevent infection. If disposable surgical gloves are readily available, use them. Butterfly Bandages How to Stop a Nosebleed More »

Emergencies and First Aid - Childbirth

Birth of the Placenta If you are called on to help deliver a baby, remember that childbirth is a natural process and that your role is to assist the woman and offer encouragement. If a woman's contractions are very strong and 2 to 3 minutes apart or the water bag (amniotic sac) has broken, birth is very near. If the woman tells you that the birth will happen very soon, believe her. You will see quite a bit of blood, which is normal. You may see bloody fluid coming from the vagina before and during the birth; this is also normal. More »

Emergencies and First Aid - Removing a Stuck Ring

1 Pass an end of fine string or dental floss under the ring. With the other end, begin tightly wrapping the string around the finger. Ensure that the string is wrapped evenly and smoothly past the lower knuckle. 2 With the end that was passed under the ring, begin unwrapping the string in the same direction. The ring should move over the string as the string is unwrapped. If the ring cannot be removed, unwrap the string and immediately seek urgent care.     More »

Emergencies and First Aid -— Broken Bones

Broken bones (fractures) are usually not life-threatening. A fracture may not be visible to you through the skin. Symptoms include intense pain, swelling, increased pain when trying to move the injured area, or bleeding. A broken bone always requires medical attention. Immediate careCall out for someone to get help, or call 911 yourself. Do not move or straighten the broken bone. Splinting is not necessary unless the person needs to be moved without assistance from ambulance personnel or unless the fracture has blocked blood supply to the limb. If the fracture site is deformed and the skin beyond the site of the fracture is cold, pale, and blue, pull gently lengthwise on the limb to straighten the fracture and then splint the limb. How to Make a Sling More »