Tinea Versicolor

Many microorganisms normally live on our skin, including a group of yeast species called Malassezia. (Round or oval yeasts in this group were previously known by the names Pityrosporum orbiculare and Pityrosporum ovalis.) The yeast lives in our pores. Under certain conditions, it can shift its form from a round or oval yeast shape to a string-like, branching shape. These branching forms are named hyphae. The yeast can migrate under the skin and produce azelaic acid, a substance that can change the amount of pigment (color) in new skin cells. In its hyphae form, the yeast causes a rash called tinea versicolor, also called pityriasis versicolor.  
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