Simple steps to save money on your prescription medications, from the February 2014 Harvard Health Letter

When it comes to saving money on prescription medications, the local pharmacy may not have the best deal, reports the February 2014 Harvard Health Letter. "A little digging is all it takes to find out," says Laura Carr, a pharmacist at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. For people who have to pay the full cost of their medications, or who have a high copay, shopping around is worth it. Deals can sometimes be found simply by calling a few nearby pharmacies for price checks before dropping off a prescription. Some pharmacies get their drugs from a wholesaler, which has purchased the drugs from the manufacturer. But other pharmacies are able to buy directly from the manufacturer, cut out the middleman, and offer lower prices. As a result, the drug store on one corner may sell a particular medication at a lower price than the store on the opposite corner. Big box stores and some grocery chains may also have lower prices. Such stores offer 30- and 90-day supplies of dozens of generic drugs for as little as $4 to $10. A list of covered medications should be available from the in-store pharmacy.
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