Hopeful new direction for Alzheimer’s research, from the February 2013 Harvard Women's Health Watch

None of the current treatments for Alzheimer's can stop the disease or slow the process that leads to its theft of memory and personality. A new direction in Alzheimer's research, highlighted in the February 2013 issue of Harvard Women's Health Watch, may someday change that.

"For the past 20 or even 30 years we've been focused on treating the end stage of Alzheimer's, and we must shift our paradigm to start thinking about prevention," says Dr. Reisa Sperling, director of the Center for Alzheimer's Research and Treatment at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital.

Dr. Sperling and other researchers are focusing on several approaches for early intervention, before Alzheimer's affects memory, thinking, and behavior. Three key areas include:

To continue reading this article, you must login.
  • Research health conditions
  • Check your symptoms
  • Prepare for a doctor's visit or test
  • Find the best treatments and procedures for you
  • Explore options for better nutrition and exercise
Learn more about the many benefits and features of joining Harvard Health Online »