Enlarged prostate and over-the-counter drugs

Men with slow urine flow from enlargement of the prostate gland (known as benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH) should avoid anything that makes the situation worse—and that includes some medications. The most common offenders are over-the-counter cold and allergy remedies. Now, some research suggests that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen and naproxen, may also affect the prostate's function, reports the September 2007 issue of Harvard Men's Health Watch. Researchers in the Netherlands found that the risk of acute urinary retention (severe difficulty urinating) was twice as high in men taking NSAIDs as in men who were not using them. By contrast, though, researchers in America evaluating the long-term effects of NSAIDs on the prostate found that daily NSAID use was linked to a reduced risk of developing BPH symptoms and slow urinary flow rates. At first glance the studies seem contradictory, but a closer look suggests that NSAIDs may be both friend and foe, depending on the stage of BPH and the part of the urinary tract that's vulnerable.
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