Easing social anxiety during the holidays: Tips from the Harvard Women's Health Watch

For most people, family gatherings, parties, and other social activities are part of the fun of the holiday season. Not so for those with social anxiety disorder, who dread—or even avoid—social situations, reports the December 2008 issue of Harvard Women's Health Watch.

It's perfectly normal to feel nervous about meeting new people or attending parties. But if you feel inordinately uneasy and self-conscious in such everyday social situations, and sometimes find yourself skipping them, you may have social anxiety disorder. The thought of proposing a toast, socializing with people you don't know well, or just making small talk may be terrifying. You may experience palpitations, sweating, confusion, or other symptoms of anxiety. Even if you make yourself socialize, you may feel miserable before, during, and afterward. The problem isn't limited to parties, but may affect your life at school and work, too.

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