Risk factors for breast cancer

Not all women have the same risk for developing breast cancer over a lifetime. Certain factors increase a woman’s risk, and some have a bigger impact on risk than others. However, having several risk factors doesn’t mean you’ll inevitably develop breast cancer. Likewise, having few risk factors doesn’t mean that you’ll never develop it. Many risk factors, such as age and gender, are not within our control. Others, especially those related to personal behaviors, can be modified. (Locked) More »

The breast density-breast cancer connection

One of the strongest known risk factors for breast cancer is high breast density — that is, relatively little fat in the breast and more connective and glandular tissue, as seen on a mammogram. Now, a study has found that higher breast density in postmenopausal women increases the risk of specific types of breast cancer, including some that have a relatively poorer prognosis. More »

How to get rid of warts

Warts are generally harmless and often disappear on their own over time, but they're unsightly, and some, like those found on the soles of the feet, can make walking and exercise painful. Getting rid of warts can be a challenge, but fortunately, the most effective treatments are the least invasive. More »

Update on vibration therapy for bone health

Soon you may be hearing a lot about low-intensity vibration therapy for strengthening bones and reducing the risk of fractures. Two low-intensity oscillating devices designed for home use are coming onto the market, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), which advises the federal government on health care matters, is expected to issue a report highlighting the evidence as well as the many unanswered questions about this unique approach to help postmenopausal women at risk for osteoporosis. (Locked) More »

Novel foot-health program reduces falls in older people

About a third of people over age 65 fall each year, and foot problems are one of the major causes. A program aimed at improving the foot health of older people through examinations, exercises, advice, and orthotic shoe inserts may help prevent falls. (Locked) More »

Regular exercise may ward off cognitive decline in women with vascular disease

A study provides one more reason to carve out time every day for a brisk walk or similar exercise, especially if you have vascular disease or are at risk for developing it. Vascular disease, including heart disease and other conditions that affect blood vessels, increases the risk of age-related problems with memory and thinking, known as cognitive decline. (Locked) More »