Magnesium content in milligrams (mg) of certain foods

Surveys suggest that many Americans don't get enough magnesium in their diets. It's important to make sure that you're including whole grains, dark-green leafy vegetables, and legumes in your diet. Here's a list of foods and their magnesium content. (Locked) More »

Depression and cardiovascular risk in women

Smoking, poor diet, physical inactivity, high cholesterol, obesity, high blood pressure, and diabetes increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). There's mounting evidence that depression should be added to this list. Research suggests that it increases the chances of developing heart disease and stroke, even after factors such as smoking are taken into account. Two investigations highlight the relationship between depression and CVD in postmenopausal women. (Locked) More »

The overlooked hazards of holiday eating

Most people are aware of the dangers of overeating and overimbibing during the winter holidays, but few worry about a lesser-known risk of year-end celebrations. Every year, 48 million Americans develop foodborne illness (also known as food poisoning or stomach flu), most of which isn't reported to health authorities. Festive dinners and buffets offer more opportunities for contamination than most meals, but you can greatly reduce your risk by taking a few precautions. More »

Staying active despite osteoporosis

Whether it comes after a broken bone or a low bone density reading, a diagnosis of osteoporosis spurs you to rethink your relationship with exercise. An exercise program will not only make your bones more resilient, but also help you avoid falls and fractures and lower your risk for chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes — all of which are important in preserving your mobility and independence.  (Locked) More »

Study elucidates health risks for DES daughters

The synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) was widely prescribed in the 1940s, '50s, and '60s to prevent miscarriage and premature delivery. Its dangers were first revealed in the early 1970s, when Harvard-affiliated researchers linked the drug to a rare cancer of the vagina and cervix in the daughters of women who took DES while pregnant. In 1971, the FDA issued a warning against its use by pregnant women, but five to 10 million pregnant women and their babies had already been exposed. In the following decades, many other health problems were discovered among DES daughters and have been documented in a follow-up study. (Locked) More »