Types of psychotherapy

Which type of psychotherapy works best? Many people find that a blended approach — one that draws on elements of different schools of psychotherapy — suits them best. There are many forms of psychotherapy, but the two most popular forms are psychodynamic therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy. (Locked) More »

Psychotherapy at midlife

Midlife is not too late for women to reap the benefits of change by seeking the help they need to gain greater satisfaction in their lives. One avenue to change is psychotherapy. Successful psychotherapy can heighten your awareness and insight into your actions, thoughts, and feelings and help you learn and practice more effective ways of thinking and behaving. Either alone or combined with medication, psychotherapy is valuable in treating a wide range of mental health conditions. But even if you're not trying to solve a fixed psychological problem, psychotherapy may provide help in challenging situations or guidance in creating a happier or more fulfilled life. More »

Diagnosing and treating interstitial cystitis

Interstitial cystitis is a painful, chronic bladder condition also called painful bladder syndrome, that disproportionately affects women. It causes recurring bouts of pain and pressure in the bladder and pelvic area, often accompanied by an urgent and frequent need to urinate. Because symptoms are so variable, experts today describe interstitial cystitis as a member of a group of disorders collectively referred to as interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. There's no cure for IC, but many treatments offer some relief, either singly or in combination. Figuring out what works can be hit-or-miss; there's no way to predict who will respond best to which treatment. More »

Another drug prevents breast cancer in postmenopausal women

Exemestane (Aromasin), tamoxifen (Nolvadex, generic) and raloxifene (Evista) are three drugs used to prevent breast cancer in postmenopausal women who are at elevated risk for the disease. Exemestane appears to have less frightening side effects — hot flashes, joint pain, and loss of bone density. All three of these drugs target estrogen, which fuels the growth of most breast cancers, but exemestane belongs to a different class of drugs, called aromatase inhibitors, which work by blocking the body's production of estrogen. Previous studies have shown that aromatase inhibitors are more effective than tamoxifen in preventing breast cancer from recurring. This study, funded Pfizer, and conducted under the auspices of the National Cancer Institute's clinical trials unit, looked at whether exemestane could reduce the likelihood of a first occurrence of breast cancer. (Locked) More »

Fibroid embolization and surgery have similar five-year outcomes

Uterine artery embolization (UAE) — a minimally invasive procedure that shrinks fibroids by cutting off their blood supply — is an alternative treatment for women wanting to avoid surgery. Short-term studies have shown that UAE and surgery produce similar improvement in symptoms and quality of life. Now, a controlled study has found that the same is true even after five years. (Locked) More »