Cancer and diet: What’s the connection?

Much research has suggested that certain foods and nutrients may help prevent—or, conversely, contribute to—certain types of cancer. While it is not 100% certain that consuming more or less of certain foods or nutrients will guarantee cancer protection, science has found that processed meats, high-glycemic-index foods, calcium, and antioxidant-rich foods may have the greatest influence on a person’s risk.  (Locked) More »

What can be done about droopy eyelids?

Droopy eyelids, known as ptosis, are often a normal occurrence of aging although some neurologic conditions also can cause the condition. Ptosis is not a serious problem unless it interferes with your vision. If this happens, or if your droopy eyelids are bothersome, you can opt for cosmetic surgery to repair your eyelids. More »

Walking while golfing: Is this sufficient exercise?

Studies of golfers have found that playing 18 holes is about equal to brisk walking in terms of intensity—even though golf walking is stop-and-go. However, in order to gain the maximum cardiovascular benefit from exercise, people may want to add a day or two of higher-intensity activities, such as running, tennis, or something similar that raises your heart rate. (Locked) More »

Can you grow new brain cells?

The science of neurogenesis suggests it’s possible to create new neurons in the hippocampus, which can improve a person’s memory and thinking skills. Research has found that certain types of aerobic activities, stress relievers, and brain exercises can stimulate neurogenesis. (Locked) More »

Ease your pain by controlling your mind

Dependency on pain medication is on the rise, and studies have found that many older adults are at a high risk for addiction, hospitalization, and even death because of the habit of managing pain with drugs. A safer approach may be for people to change their mental perception of pain. Doing this enables them to increase their tolerance levels and not be so quick to reach for the pill bottle.  (Locked) More »

Why push-ups help beat aging

The classic push-up offers a real-time measurement of strength and endurance. It can be modified to fit any fitness level or limitation and can be a valuable tool to improve muscular strength and muscle memory. By varying the speed of a push-up, the angle of the body, and even hand placement, a person can increase or reduce intensity as needed or focus on specific muscles. (Locked) More »

Join the healthy heart trend

A recent report from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey found the rates for heart disease among people ages 60 and older have fallen from 19.5% to 14.9% in the past decade. Three factors may explain the drop in heart disease rates, according to the survey researchers: better diet, increased physical activity, and more use of drug therapy like aspirin therapy and statins. More »

Whole grains associated with lower death rates

Eating 70 grams (four servings) of whole grains daily may lower your risk of death from cardiovascular disease and cancer, according to a study in Circulation. One serving of 100% whole-grain food contains about 16 grams. Examples include one slice of 100% whole-grain bread or a half cup of oatmeal or cooked whole-grain pasta.  More »

Meditation may ease anxiety from active surveillance

A mindfulness-based stress reduction program (MBSR) can help control anxiety among men who follow active surveillance for prostate cancer. The wait-and-see approach can make men feel so uneasy about their condition that they opt for treatment with radiation therapy or surgery when it is unnecessary. MBSR not only eases anxiety levels, but also inspires men to be more proactive about their health and adopt lifestyle changes like a proper diet and exercise. More »

Many older adults take unneeded blood pressure drugs

About 66% of adults over age 70 still take antihypertensive medication even though they now have low pressures, says a study from the University of Kent in the United Kingdom. Researchers say this exposes adults to medication side effects like dizziness and falls.  More »