By the way, doctor: What can I do about ischial bursitis?

Q. I have a pain in my right buttock, which my doctor says is ischial bursitis. Is there anything I can do for the pain or to make the condition go away?

A. Ischial bursitis, sometimes called ischiogluteal bursitis, is an inflammation of the fluid-filled sac, or bursa, that lies between the ischial tuberosity (the lower part of the V-shaped bone that helps form the pelvis) and the tendon that attaches the hamstring muscle to the bone (see illustration). Injury or overuse can cause the bursa to become inflamed, swollen, and painful — a condition called bursitis. Bursitis is also caused by inflammation or injury to a nearby tendon. Ischial bursitis can result from sitting for long periods on a hard surface, from direct trauma to the area, or from injury to the hamstring muscle or tendon through activities such as running or bicycling.

Ischial bursitis exercise

The condition causes pain at the center of the buttock that may radiate down the back of the leg and be felt during walking, sitting, or even flexing the hip at rest. It's often confused with sciatica — pain caused by irritation to the sciatic nerve, which runs from the lower back through the buttock and down the leg. How-ever, a clinician can usually tell the difference by doing a physical examination.

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